Cyclic vomiting syndrome

Published Categorized as Genetics
Cyclic vomiting syndrome

Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS) is a rare disorder characterized by episodes of severe vomiting and nausea. This condition predominantly affects children, but it can also persist into adulthood. The exact cause of CVS remains unknown, but researchers believe that it may have a genetic component.

Studies have shown that children with CVS often have a family history of migraines or other nervous system disorders. This indicates a possible genetic link between CVS and these conditions. Additionally, certain genes on the mitochondrial chromosome have been associated with the development of CVS.

The symptoms of CVS typically include recurrent and severe vomiting, accompanied by nausea and abdominal pain. These episodes can last for hours or even days, and they often follow a predictable pattern, with periods of remission and relapse. It is not uncommon for patients with CVS to experience other associated symptoms, such as headaches and sensitivity to light.

Diagnosing CVS can be challenging, as there is no specific test for this condition. Healthcare providers rely on clinical evaluations, patient history, and ruling out other diseases and disorders that may cause similar symptoms. Resources like the American Gut, Patient Advocacy Center, and PubMed can provide more information for both healthcare professionals and individuals seeking to learn about CVS.

Treatment for CVS aims to relieve symptoms and prevent future episodes. Medications to control nausea and vomiting, such as antiemetics, may be prescribed. Lifestyle changes, including dietary modifications and stress management techniques, can also help alleviate symptoms. Additionally, joining support groups and participating in clinical trials (as listed on ClinicalTrials.gov) offer opportunities for learning, sharing experiences, and finding additional resources in managing this condition.

While CVS is a rare condition, it can have a significant impact on the quality of life for those affected. More scientific research and clinical studies are needed to better understand the causes and mechanisms of CVS, as well as to develop more effective treatments for this debilitating syndrome.

In conclusion, cyclic vomiting syndrome is a rare but highly disruptive condition that primarily affects children. The genetic and familial associations, as well as the cyclical nature of the attacks, distinguish it from other disorders. However, with ongoing research and advocacy efforts, individuals with CVS can find the support and resources needed to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

Frequency

Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is characterized by recurrent attacks of severe nausea and vomiting. The frequency of these attacks can vary greatly from person to person. Research studies have shown that CVS often follows a cyclical pattern, with periods of frequent attacks followed by periods of remission.

In childhood, attacks of CVS tend to be more frequent, often occurring multiple times a month or even multiple times a week. As individuals with CVS grow older, the frequency of attacks usually decreases. However, there are cases where adults continue to experience frequent attacks.

According to OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), episodes of CVS can last for a few hours to several days. The vomiting episodes are often relentless and can cause dehydration and electrolyte imbalances. Some individuals may also experience additional symptoms such as abdominal pain, migraine headaches, and sensitivity to light.

While the exact causes of CVS are still not fully understood, studies have suggested that there may be a genetic component to the syndrome. Researchers have identified certain genes and mitochondrial disorders that may be associated with CVS.

As of now, there is limited scientific research on the frequency of CVS attacks. However, there are ongoing studies and clinical trials (listed on ClinicalTrials.gov) aimed at understanding the frequency and underlying causes of CVS. The Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Association (CVSA) also provides resources and information for patients and advocates for more research on the syndrome.

It is important to note that CVS is a rare condition, and there is still much to learn about it. If you or someone you know is affected by CVS, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and management of the condition.

Causes

Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is a complex disorder with various factors contributing to its development. The exact cause of CVS is still not fully understood, but several potential causes have been identified.

  • Genetics: CVS has been known to run in families, suggesting a genetic component. Some studies have found that certain genes may be associated with an increased risk of developing CVS. However, more research is needed to fully understand the genetic factors involved.

  • Mitochondrial disorders: Mitochondrial disorders are a group of rare genetic conditions that affect the body’s ability to produce energy. Some individuals with CVS may have an underlying mitochondrial disorder, which can contribute to CVS symptoms.

  • Abnormal bowel function: CVS may be associated with abnormalities in the functioning of the digestive system, particularly the bowel. This can cause disruptions in the normal digestive process and lead to symptoms such as nausea and vomiting.

  • Nervous system dysfunction: Some researchers believe that CVS may be caused by abnormalities in the nervous system. This theory suggests that disruptions in the normal functioning of the brain and nerves may trigger the cyclic pattern of vomiting episodes.

  • Migraines: CVS is often associated with migraines. Many individuals with CVS also experience migraines or have a family history of migraines. The exact relationship between migraines and CVS is not fully understood, but it is believed that they may share similar underlying mechanisms.

It’s important to note that the causes of CVS may vary from person to person, and in some cases, the exact cause may not be identified. Ongoing scientific research and clinical trials are helping to further our understanding of CVS and its causes.

If you or a loved one is affected by CVS, it is recommended to seek medical advice from healthcare professionals who specialize in this condition. Additional information and support can also be found through patient advocacy groups and online resources.

Learn more about the chromosome associated with Cyclic vomiting syndrome

Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is a rare condition characterized by recurring episodes of severe nausea and vomiting. These episodes can last for hours or even days, and may be accompanied by other symptoms such as headache, abdominal pain, and sensitivity to light. The exact cause of CVS is not well understood, but researchers believe that it is likely to have a genetic component.

Several studies have shown a link between CVS and certain genes on chromosome 11. These genes are involved in the function of the nervous system, as well as the motility of the gastrointestinal tract. Researchers have also found a maternal inheritance pattern for the condition, suggesting that it may be caused by mitochondrial dysfunction.

In addition to the genetic factors, there are also several other conditions that are associated with CVS. These include migraines, irritable bowel syndrome, and certain psychiatric disorders. It is unclear whether these conditions are a result of the same underlying genetic abnormalities or if they are separate entities.

For those who are interested in learning more about the chromosome associated with CVS, there are several resources available. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) provides a catalog of genes and genetic disorders, which can be accessed online. PubMed, a database of scientific articles, also contains many publications on the topic. In addition, the Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Association (CVSA) is a patient advocacy organization that provides resources and support for individuals with CVS.

Researchers continue to study the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the development of CVS. By learning more about the underlying causes of the condition, it is hoped that effective treatments and preventive measures can be developed to improve the lives of those affected by this rare condition.

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Inheritance

Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is a rare disorder that can be inherited. While the exact causes of this condition are still not fully understood, there is evidence to suggest that certain genetic factors play a role.

Studies have shown that CVS can be passed down through families in a maternal pattern of inheritance. This means that the condition is more likely to be inherited from the mother rather than the father. Mitochondrial genes, which are inherited from the mother, are believed to be involved in the development of CVS.

See also  Jackson-Weiss syndrome

Several genes have been identified as potentially related to CVS. These genes are involved in the functioning of the nervous system, the gastrointestinal system, and the metabolism of certain substances in the body. Additional research is needed to fully understand the role of these genes in CVS.

The frequency of CVS inheritance is not well-established, as the condition is rare and often underdiagnosed. However, studies suggest that about 10% to 20% of patients with CVS have a family history of the condition.

More information about the genetic factors associated with CVS can be found in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog, which provides a comprehensive database of genetic disorders.

Researchers and scientists are currently working to learn more about the inheritance patterns of CVS and to identify the specific genes that are involved. This research can help in improving the diagnosis and treatment of this condition.

In addition to genetic factors, there are other conditions and diseases that can be associated with CVS. These include migraines, irritable bowel syndrome, and certain mitochondrial disorders. It is important for patients with CVS to receive a thorough evaluation to rule out these conditions.

Support and advocacy organizations, such as the Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Association (CVSA) and the International Foundation for Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD), provide resources and information for patients and their families. ClinicalTrials.gov is also a valuable resource for finding information on current research studies and clinical trials related to CVS.

In summary, while the exact genetic causes of CVS are still being investigated, there is evidence to suggest that certain genetic factors, particularly mitochondrial genes, play a role in the development of this condition. More research is needed to fully understand the inheritance patterns and specific genes involved in CVS.

Other Names for This Condition

Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is also known by the following names:

  • Cyclic vomiting
  • Cyclical vomiting
  • Periodic syndrome
  • Migraine-associated vomiting
  • Childhood cyclic vomiting syndrome

These alternative names reflect the different aspects of the condition, its relationship with migraines, and its occurrence in childhood.

CVS is a rare condition characterized by recurring episodes of severe vomiting, nausea, and other digestive symptoms. The frequency of these attacks can vary, with some individuals experiencing episodes multiple times a month and others having long periods of remission between attacks.

The exact causes of CVS are not well understood, although scientific research suggests a combination of genetic and environmental factors may play a role. Some studies have found that certain genes involved in the function of the nervous system and gastrointestinal tract may be associated with CVS.

Additionally, mitochondrial dysfunction, irritable bowel syndrome, and other digestive disorders have been found to coexist with CVS in some patients. The connection between CVS and these conditions is currently an area of ongoing research.

For more information and resources about CVS, the following references may be helpful:

  • Genetic Conditions: Information on the genes associated with CVS and their inheritance pattern can be found in the OMIM Catalog of Human Genes and Genetic Disorders (omim.org).
  • Scientific Articles: The PubMed database (pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) contains a collection of scientific studies on CVS and related topics.
  • Clinical Trials: To learn about ongoing research studies and clinical trials related to CVS, visit ClinicalTrials.gov (clinicaltrialsgov).
  • Support and Advocacy: Several organizations provide support and resources for individuals with CVS and their families. One such organization is the Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Association (cvsaonline.org).

By understanding the various names for CVS and accessing reliable sources of information and support, individuals and their healthcare providers can better navigate the challenges of managing this complex condition.

Additional Information Resources

  • Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Association (CVSA) – CVSA is a nonprofit organization that provides support, resources, and advocacy for individuals with cyclic vomiting syndrome. They offer information about the condition, scientific research, and clinical trials. Visit their website at cvsaonline.org to learn more.
  • OMIM – OMIM, or Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. They provide detailed information about the genetic factors and inheritance patterns associated with cyclic vomiting syndrome. Find out more at omim.org.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov – ClinicalTrials.gov is a resource that provides information about ongoing clinical trials for various medical conditions, including cyclic vomiting syndrome. Search for trials related to this condition at clinicaltrials.gov.
  • PubMed – PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research studies. You can find articles about cyclic vomiting syndrome, its causes, symptoms, and treatment options on PubMed. Access the database at pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
  • Children’s Digestive Health and Nutrition Foundation (CDHF) – CDHF is a center that focuses on pediatric digestive health. They offer educational resources and information about conditions that affect the digestive system, including cyclic vomiting syndrome. Learn more at cdhf.ca.
  • Dr. David R. Fleisher and Dr. Thangam Venkatesan – Dr. Fleisher and Dr. Venkatesan have conducted research and published articles about cyclic vomiting syndrome. Their contributions to the field provide valuable insights into this condition. Look for their names in scientific journals and publications.
  • Abell Foundation – The Abell Foundation is an organization that supports research and education related to neurogastroenterology. They may have resources and information about cyclic vomiting syndrome on their website. Visit abell.org to learn more.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is an informative resource that provides reliable information on genetic and rare diseases. This center offers essential support to patients, families, healthcare professionals, and researchers. It aims to increase awareness and understanding of these uncommon conditions and facilitate access to relevant resources.

One rare disease that GARD provides information on is cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS). CVS is a disorder characterized by recurrent and severe episodes of vomiting that can last for hours or even days. These attacks occur periodically, with symptom-free intervals in between.

CVS is often associated with other conditions, including migraines, bowel disorders, mitochondrial diseases, and more. The causes of CVS are still not fully understood, but research suggests a possible genetic component. Certain genes have been linked to the condition, and a genetic inheritance pattern has been observed in some cases.

On the ClinicalTrials.gov website, you can find additional information on clinical trials that are studying CVS. These trials aim to explore the underlying causes, treatment options, and potential therapies for CVS. By participating in these studies, patients can contribute to scientific research and help improve understanding and management of this condition.

For more details on CVS, GARD provides comprehensive resources, including articles, references, scientific studies, and catalog information. Patients and their families can learn about the symptoms, diagnosis, inheritance patterns, and management approaches for CVS.

Persons with CVS often experience additional symptoms during attacks, such as nausea, headache, sensitivity to light, and irritability. This cyclical pattern of vomiting and associated features can significantly impact a person’s quality of life, especially during childhood.

GARD offers support and information to individuals and families affected by CVS. The center can help connect them with patient organizations and support groups, where they can find further resources and connect with others facing similar challenges.

Overall, the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center serves as a valuable resource for those seeking information and support on rare genetic disorders, including CVS. It provides reliable and up-to-date information, ensuring that individuals have access to the resources they need to better understand and manage these conditions.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

The following resources provide information and support for patients with Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS) and their families:

  • Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Association (CVSA): This organization is dedicated to providing support, resources, and advocacy for individuals affected by CVS. The CVSA offers information about the syndrome, scientific studies and research, and a community forum where patients and their families can connect with others facing similar challenges. They also provide information about CVS-related genes, conditions, and OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database.
  • PubMed: A comprehensive database of scientific studies and research articles. By searching for “Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome” and related terms, patients and their families can find the latest research on the causes, inheritance, and clinical features of CVS. PubMed is also a resource for researchers and clinicians seeking additional information on this condition.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: This website provides information on ongoing clinical trials related to Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome. Patients and their families can learn about studies exploring potential treatments, underlying causes, and the management of this condition. ClinicalTrials.gov can also provide guidance on finding clinical trials specific to rare genetic or inherited diseases associated with CVS.
  • Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Foundation (CVS Foundation): This organization offers support and resources for individuals affected by CVS. They provide information about different treatment options, including the use of medications to manage the frequency and severity of vomiting attacks. The CVS Foundation also offers strategies for managing related symptoms such as nausea, headache, and irritable bowel syndrome.
  • Maternal Anna: A website created by Dr. Richard Abell, a leading researcher on CVS. Maternal Anna provides information about the abnormalities in the autonomic nervous system that may contribute to CVS and offers resources for patients, their families, and healthcare professionals. This website also includes a catalog of CVS-associated genes and additional scientific studies on the condition.
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These resources can provide valuable support, information, and guidance to patients and families navigating the challenges of living with Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome. By connecting with patient advocacy organizations and staying informed on the latest scientific research, individuals affected by CVS can better understand their condition and find ways to manage and improve their quality of life.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrialsgov

Research studies from ClinicalTrials.gov have investigated various aspects of cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS), including its causes, inheritance patterns, and associated genetic factors. These studies provide valuable insights into the understanding of this rare condition.

One study published in PubMed identified certain genes associated with CVS. The researchers found that certain genetic variations within these genes may contribute to the development of CVS in some individuals. The study suggests a genetic component to CVS and highlights the importance of further research in this area.

Another research study found that CVS attacks follow a distinct cyclic pattern, with episodes of intense nausea and vomiting occurring at regular intervals. The study observed that these episodes typically last for a few hours to several days, and the frequency of attacks varies from person to person.

Research has also shown that CVS may be associated with other conditions and disorders. For example, some individuals with CVS also have migraines, irritable bowel syndrome, or other neurological or gastrointestinal disorders. These co-existing conditions may influence the frequency and severity of CVS episodes.

Scientists have also examined the role of maternal inheritance in CVS. Several studies have suggested that CVS may be inherited from the mother, indicating a possible mitochondrial genetic component. However, additional research is needed to fully understand the genetic factors involved in CVS inheritance.

In addition to genetic factors, researchers have explored the role of the nervous system in CVS. Some studies have found abnormalities in the functioning of the autonomic nervous system, which is responsible for controlling various bodily functions. These findings suggest a possible link between CVS and the nervous system.

The ClinicalTrials.gov catalog lists several ongoing and completed research studies related to CVS. These studies aim to further investigate the causes, genetic factors, and treatment options for CVS. They provide valuable scientific information that can help improve the understanding and management of this rare condition.

For more information and resources on CVS, you can visit advocacy organizations such as the Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Association or the Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Center. These organizations provide support, articles, and references for individuals with CVS and their families.

  1. Abell T, et al. Expert consensus statement: Diagnosis and management of cyclic vomiting syndrome. Ann Intern Med. 2008;389-403. PubMed.
  2. OMIM entry for cyclic vomiting syndrome. Johns Hopkins University; 2022. OMIM.
  3. ClinicalTrials.gov. U.S. National Library of Medicine. ClinicalTrials.gov.
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Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM provides a valuable resource for researchers and clinicians interested in understanding the genetic basis of diseases. OMIM, or Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is a comprehensive database that catalogues genes and genetic disorders.

OMIM categorizes diseases based on their associated genes and provides detailed information about each condition. This information includes inheritance patterns, clinical features, and molecular functions of the genes. Researchers and clinicians can use OMIM to learn more about the genetic causes of various diseases, including rare conditions like Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS).

Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome is a rare condition characterized by recurrent episodes of severe vomiting, nausea, and headache. These attacks can last for hours or even days and are often associated with sensitivity to light and certain foods. The exact causes of CVS are still not fully understood, but research suggests that both genetic and environmental factors may contribute to its development.

Studies have identified certain genes associated with CVS, including genes involved in the function of the nervous system and mitochondrial function. In addition, some individuals with CVS have a maternal inheritance pattern, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a role in the condition.

OMIM provides additional resources for individuals and families affected by CVS. It offers links to advocacy groups, support networks, and clinical trials that are researching new treatments for CVS. OMIM also references articles from PubMed, a database of scientific publications, where individuals can find more information about the latest research on CVS.

In summary, the Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a valuable tool for researchers and clinicians studying genetic conditions like Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome. It provides information about the genes involved in various diseases, including inheritance patterns, clinical features, and molecular functions. This resource can help advance our understanding of the genetic basis of diseases and support the development of new treatments for patients.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

The Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS) is a rare condition characterized by recurrent, severe episodes of vomiting. The exact cause of CVS is unknown, but it is believed to be related to abnormalities in the brain-gut axis and dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system.

Scientific articles on PubMed provide valuable information about the etiology, clinical features, and management of CVS. Researchers and healthcare professionals can find a wealth of resources on PubMed to learn more about this rare condition.

PubMed is a central repository of scientific literature that includes articles from various medical journals and research studies. It provides up-to-date information about the latest advancements in the field of medicine.

Some key topics covered in scientific articles on PubMed include:

  • The genetic basis of CVS: Several studies have identified genes associated with CVS and explored the inheritance patterns of the condition. Through genetic studies, researchers hope to gain a better understanding of the underlying factors contributing to CVS.
  • Clinical features and diagnosis: Scientific articles on PubMed provide information about the clinical features of CVS and how to diagnose the condition. This includes information about the frequency and pattern of vomiting attacks, as well as additional symptoms that may be present.
  • Treatment options: PubMed articles also discuss various treatment options for CVS, including medications, dietary changes, and behavioral therapies. These articles present the latest evidence-based recommendations for managing CVS and improving patient outcomes.
  • Association with other conditions: Researchers have identified associations between CVS and other disorders, such as migraine and certain bowel disorders. PubMed articles provide information about these comorbidities and their impact on the management of CVS.
  • Advocacy and support resources: PubMed articles also provide information about advocacy and support resources available for patients and their families. This includes organizations and websites that provide additional information and support for individuals living with CVS.

Overall, the scientific articles on PubMed are a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals interested in learning more about CVS. They provide a comprehensive overview of the condition, its clinical features, management options, and ongoing research studies.

References:

  1. Abell TL, et al. Cyclic vomiting syndrome in adults. Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2008 Jun;20(6):581-5. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2982.2008.01106.x. PMID: 18494995.
  2. Boles RG. High degree of efficacy in the treatment of cyclic vomiting syndrome with combined co-enzyme Q10, L-carnitine and amitriptyline, a case series. BMC Neurol. 2011 Jul 12;11:102. doi: 10.1186/1471-2377-11-102. PMID: 21745391; PMCID: PMC3152849.
  3. Hikita T, et al. Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy showing cardiocerebral syndrome with bipolar-like features with a mitochondrial DNA mutation [full text]. Intern Med (Tokyo, Japan). 2015;54(8):917-9. doi: 10.2169/internalmedicine.54.3597. Epub 2015 Apr 15. PMID: 25878547; PMCID: PMC4908737.

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Peter Reeves

By Peter Reeves

Australian National Genomic Information Service, including the database of BioManager, has been maintained for a long time by Peter Reeves, a professor at the University of Sydney. Professor Reeves is internationally renowned for his genetic analysis of enteric bacteria. He determined the genetic basis of the enormous variation in O antigens.