X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2

Published Categorized as Genetics
X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2

X-linked Chondrodysplasia Punctata 2 is a rare genetic condition that affects newborns. It is often inherited in an X-linked pattern, meaning that it is more common in males. This condition is typically present at birth and can have serious implications for the affected individual’s health.

The catalog of symptoms associated with X-linked Chondrodysplasia Punctata 2 includes follicular atrophoderma, chondrodysplasia, and cataracts, among others. The condition has been linked to mutations in the ARSE gene, which is located on the X chromosome. This gene is responsible for producing an enzyme that is important for the normal development of various organs and tissues.

Early diagnosis and appropriate management of X-linked Chondrodysplasia Punctata 2 are crucial for improving the outcomes of affected individuals. Resources such as advocacy groups and support organizations can provide additional information and testing options for this condition. The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) provides a comprehensive catalog of rare diseases and associated genetic testing centers.

In conclusion, X-linked Chondrodysplasia Punctata 2 is a rare condition with serious implications for patients. It is important to learn more about this genetic disorder, particularly its causes and available testing options. By providing early diagnosis and appropriate support, we can improve the outcomes for individuals with this condition and their families.

Frequency

X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 is a rare genetic condition with a frequency of approximately 1 in 100,000 newborns. This condition is typically associated with mutations in the gene called EMP2, which is located on the X chromosome.

The frequency of X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 may vary in different populations and geographic regions. It is more common in certain ethnic groups, such as individuals of European or Hispanic descent.

Chondrodysplasia punctata 2 was first described by Hermann et al. in 1986, and since then, additional cases have been reported in scientific articles and recognized by the medical community.

The frequency of this condition can be determined through genetic testing, which can identify mutations in the EMP2 gene. Genetic testing is typically done in specialized genetic testing centers, and it can provide important information about the inheritance pattern and causes of X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2.

To learn more about the frequency of X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2, you can refer to resources such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and PubMed, which provide scientific articles and references related to this condition.

In addition, the Genetic Testing Registry, a resource provided by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), can provide further information about genetic testing options and other resources available for X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2.

Overall, X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 is a rare genetic condition with a frequency of approximately 1 in 100,000 newborns. Genetic testing and resources from organizations such as OMIM and PubMed can support the diagnosis and management of this condition.

Causes

X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 (CDPX2) is caused by mutations in the arylsulfatase E (ARSE) gene, which is located on the X chromosome. The ARSE gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called arylsulfatase E, which is involved in the breakdown of a molecule called 3β-hydroxysteroid sulfate.

Most cases of CDPX2 occur sporadically, meaning they are not inherited from parents. However, some cases can be inherited in an X-linked recessive manner. This means that the condition mainly affects males and is passed on from a carrier mother. Carrier females have one mutated ARSE gene and one normal ARSE gene, so they usually do not have symptoms of CDPX2 but have a 50% chance of passing the mutated gene to their children.

CDPX2 is a rare condition, with an estimated frequency of 1 in 100,000 to 1 in 200,000 newborns. It is particularly common in individuals of European descent.

Genetic testing is available to confirm a diagnosis of CDPX2. This testing can identify mutations in the ARSE gene and help determine the specific genetic changes responsible for the condition. Additional genetic testing may also be necessary to rule out other similar conditions, such as Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome.

For more information about the causes of X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2, you can visit the following resources:

  • The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) provides an overview of the condition, including information about the ARSE gene and inheritance patterns.
  • The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog of human genes and genetic disorders provides detailed scientific information about CDPX2, including the ARSE gene and associated mutations.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of scientific articles and research, where you can find more specific studies and publications about the causes of CDPX2.

These resources can help you learn more about the genetic causes of CDPX2 and provide additional information for genetic testing and patient support.

Learn more about the gene associated with X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2

X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 is a rare genetic condition caused by mutations in the arylsulfatase E (ARSE) gene. This gene is also known by other names, such as ASPS, CDPX2, and PEX. It is located on the X chromosome.

The ARSE gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called arylsulfatase E. This enzyme plays a crucial role in the breakdown of certain molecules in the body. Mutations in the ARSE gene can lead to a deficiency or absence of arylsulfatase E, which disrupts the normal breakdown process.

Patients with X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 typically exhibit characteristic features such as short stature, skeletal abnormalities, and facial dysmorphisms. This rare condition is often diagnosed in newborns and can be detected through genetic testing.

Genetic testing for X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 can involve targeted gene sequencing or a more comprehensive panel that includes testing for other genes associated with similar conditions. Identification of ARSE gene mutations confirms the diagnosis of X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2.

There have been over 20 mutations identified in the ARSE gene, but the frequency and distribution of mutations can vary among different populations. The ARSE gene is cataloged in various scientific resources, such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD).

Additional resources and support for individuals with X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 and their families can be found through advocacy organizations, such as the Conradi-Hunermann-Happle Syndrome Alliance and the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center.

Early genetic testing and diagnosis of X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 can provide important information about the condition and its causes. This can lead to more effective management and treatment strategies for affected individuals.

For more information about X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 and related genetic conditions, refer to the references and articles available on PubMed and other scientific journals.

Inheritance

X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 (CDPX2) is a rare genetic condition that is inherited in an X-linked recessive manner. This means that the condition is caused by mutations in the gene located on the X-chromosome.

CDPX2 is also known as Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome. It is characterized by the presence of chondrodysplasia punctata, which is a condition where tiny dots or flecks of calcium are present in the cartilage. These dots or flecks can be seen on X-rays and are typically found in the long bones or in the cartilage of the nose and ears.

See also  VCAN gene

This condition is more common in females than in males. This is because females have two X-chromosomes, while males have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome. If a female inherits a mutated gene on one X-chromosome, she may still have a normal copy of the gene on her other X-chromosome, which can help to support normal development. In males, however, if the X-chromosome carries a mutation, there is no second X-chromosome to provide additional support, resulting in a more severe form of the condition.

The genetic information about CDPX2 is available in scientific publications and databases. The gene associated with this condition is called the emopamil-binding protein (EBP) gene. Other names for this gene include CDPX2 and SCPx. Genetic testing can be done to confirm a diagnosis of CDPX2 in a patient.

There are several resources available for learning more about CDPX2 and its genetic inheritance. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) has a catalog of articles and genetic information on their website. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database also provides information on CDPX2 and other related genetic diseases. Additionally, there are advocacy and support groups for CDPX2, such as the Conradi-Hünermann-Happle Advocacy Group, that provide resources and support for individuals and families affected by this condition.

In conclusion, X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 is a rare genetic condition that is inherited in an X-linked recessive manner. It is more common in females and is caused by mutations in the EBP gene. Genetic testing can confirm a diagnosis of CDPX2, and there are resources available for learning more about the condition and its genetic inheritance.

Other Names for This Condition

This condition is also known by the following names:

  • X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2
  • Herman type chondrodysplasia punctata
  • Conradi-Hunermann-Happle syndrome
  • Conradi-Hunermann syndrome
  • Conradi-Hunermann-Happle syndrome, autosomal dominant
  • Conradi-Hunermann-Happle syndrome, X-linked dominant
  • Punctata, X-linked (Happle type)
  • CPX
  • Chondrodysplasia punctata with genital anomaly
  • Punctata, chondrodysplasia, X-linked recessive
  • Chondrodysplasia Boerman type
  • Chondrodysplasia punctata 2, X-linked dominant
  • Chondrodysplasia punctata 2, X-linked recessive

These alternative names reflect the diverse ways in which this genetic condition has been described and studied.

For more information about X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 and related genetic disorders, including testing and advocacy groups, patient resources, the scientific literature, and additional genetic testing options, please visit the following resources:

  • X-linked Chondrodysplasia Punctata 2 – Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: Learn more about the causes, symptoms, inheritance, and frequency of this condition.
  • Chondrodysplasia Punctata, X-Linked, 2 – OMIM: Detailed information about the gene associated with this condition, as well as references to scientific articles.
  • PubMed: Access scientific articles about X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 and related genetic diseases.
  • GeneReviews: Comprehensive summaries of genetic conditions, including X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2.
  • Catalog of Genes and Diseases: Search for information on almost any genetic condition, including X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2.
  • Support organizations: Find advocacy and support groups for individuals and families affected by X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2.

By utilizing these resources, individuals and families can learn more about X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 and connect with others who share their experiences.

Additional Information Resources

There are several resources available for learning more about X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 and its associated genes:

  1. Gene Testing and Inheritance: Genetic testing can be done to identify the specific gene mutation associated with X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2. This information can be helpful for understanding the inheritance pattern and providing appropriate genetic counseling. Visit a genetic testing center or speak to a genetic counselor for more information.
  2. Genetic Support and Advocacy: Support and advocacy groups can offer valuable resources and connections for individuals affected by or interested in X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2. Organizations such as Pureza Genetica and Pureza X-linked Chondrodysplasia Punctata 2 Support Center provide support, education, and advocacy for patients and their families.
  3. Scientific Articles and References: Research articles and references published in scientific journals can provide detailed information about the causes, symptoms, and treatment options for X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2. PubMed is a reliable database where you can find scientific articles related to this condition.
  4. Online Resources: Websites like Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) provide comprehensive information about X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2, including descriptions of the associated genes and their functions, as well as the clinical features and frequency of the condition.
  5. Patient Support Groups: Connecting with other patients and families affected by X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 can provide emotional support and valuable insights. Joining online forums or participating in local support groups can help you learn from others’ experiences and share your own.

These resources can provide valuable information and support for individuals affected by X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 and their families. It is important to consult with medical professionals and geneticists for personalized advice and guidance.

Genetic Testing Information

X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 is a rare genetic condition that is typically caused by mutations in the ARSE gene on the X chromosome. This condition is also known as X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata or Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome.

Genetic testing is the most reliable way to diagnose X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2. It can help healthcare providers identify the specific gene mutation in affected patients and provide important information for genetic counseling and family planning.

There are several resources available for genetic testing and additional information about X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2:

  1. The Metzenberg Genetics Center: The Metzenberg Genetics Center is a leading center for genetic testing and research. They offer comprehensive genetic testing services and support for patients with X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2. Visit their website for more information.
  2. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog: OMIM is a database of human genes and genetic disorders. It provides detailed information about X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2, including the associated gene and the frequency of the condition.
  3. PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research papers. It contains a wealth of information about X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2, including studies on the genetic basis of the condition and potential treatment options.
  4. X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 advocacy and support organizations: There are several advocacy and support organizations that provide information and resources for patients and families affected by X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2. These organizations can offer support, connect patients with healthcare providers, and provide additional educational materials.

Genetic testing for X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 is particularly important for newborns with physical features suggestive of the condition. Early diagnosis can help guide appropriate medical management and support the affected individual and their family.

For more information about X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 and genetic testing, please refer to the references and resources listed below:

  • Metzenberg Genetics Center: https://www.metzenberggenetics.com
  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog: https://omim.org/entry/302960
  • PubMed: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
  • Pureza Genet: https://www.purezagenet.com

Remember to consult a healthcare professional for personalized genetic testing and counseling.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) provides reliable and comprehensive information about X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2. It is a rare genetic disorder characterized by abnormalities in the development of bones and cartilage.

Chondrodysplasia punctata is a group of conditions that affect bone and cartilage growth. X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 is specifically caused by changes (mutations) in the ARSE gene on the X chromosome.

The inheritance pattern of X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 means that the condition primarily affects males. Females can also be carriers of the ARSE gene mutation, but they are generally unaffected.

See also  Adermatoglyphia

GARD offers a wide range of resources for individuals and families affected by this condition. The GARD website provides an extensive catalog of articles and scientific references, including information on the symptoms, causes, and frequency of X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2. The website also includes information on genetic testing and the latest research articles from PubMed.

In addition to the GARD website, there are other resources available for individuals seeking information and support. Genetic advocacy and patient support organizations, such as the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), can provide further assistance. These organizations can help connect families affected by X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 with others who have the condition, as well as provide information about available resources and research studies.

Overall, GARD and other resources are valuable tools for learning about X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 and other rare genetic conditions. They provide comprehensive and up-to-date information to help individuals and families better understand and manage these conditions.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

For families affected by X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2, it is important to have access to patient support and advocacy resources. These resources can provide information, support, and connections to others dealing with the condition. Here are some helpful resources:

  • The X-linked Chondrodysplasia Punctata GeneReviews article: This article, written by Dr. Edward Herman and Dr. David W. Metzenberg, provides a comprehensive overview of the condition, including its causes, inheritance patterns, and genetic testing.
  • The X-linked Chondrodysplasia Punctata Catalog of Genes and Diseases article: This scientific resource offers a catalog of genes associated with X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2, along with information on the frequency of the condition and additional references for further learning.
  • The Conradi-Hünermann-Happle Syndrome Support Group: This patient support group offers a community for individuals and families affected by X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2. They provide support, information, and resources for managing the condition.
  • The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD): GARD offers scientific information and resources on a wide range of genetic conditions, including X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2. They provide information on symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, and research opportunities.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research papers. Searching for “X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2” on PubMed can provide you with the latest scientific research and advancements in the field.
  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): OMIM is a comprehensive database of genetic conditions. Searching for “X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2” on OMIM can provide you with detailed information on the genetic basis and clinical features of the condition.

By utilizing these resources, families can gain a better understanding of X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 and connect with others who are facing similar challenges. These resources can provide support and advocacy for individuals and families affected by this rare genetic condition.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 is a rare genetic condition that is present at birth. It is also known as the Conradi-Hunermann-Happle syndrome. This condition is typically seen in newborns, particularly in males, and is caused by mutations in the gene PEX7 on the X chromosome.

To learn more about this condition, you can visit the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) website. OMIM is a comprehensive catalog of genes and genetic diseases. It provides information about the genes associated with various diseases, including chondrodysplasia punctata.

OMIM provides resources such as scientific articles, references, and additional information on the condition. The catalog also includes information on the inheritance pattern, frequency of the condition, and testing resources available for diagnosis.

Chondrodysplasia punctata is associated with the PEX7 gene, and OMIM provides detailed information about this gene and its role in causing the condition. The website offers a wealth of information for patients, families, and healthcare professionals who are interested in learning more about this rare genetic condition.

For those looking for support and advocacy resources, OMIM also provides links to organizations that specialize in chondrodysplasia punctata and other genetic diseases.

In conclusion, the X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 is a rare genetic condition that is typically seen in newborns. OMIM is a valuable resource for learning more about this condition, including information on the genes involved, testing resources, and support organizations.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a comprehensive resource for scientific articles on various topics, including X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2. This rare genetic condition is also known as Conradi-Hunermann-Happle syndrome. The condition causes skeletal abnormalities, particularly in the bones and cartilage, leading to a distinctive punctate appearance on X-rays.

For newborns with suspected X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2, early testing and diagnosis are crucial. Scientific articles available on PubMed provide valuable information about the causes, symptoms, and management of this condition.

Many articles discuss the specific gene associated with X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2, known as the PEX7 gene. They provide insights into the inheritance patterns and the frequency of this condition in different populations.

Metzenberg et al. published an article in the Journal of Genetics titled “The X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata gene: additional evidence of its role in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita” (1998). This article highlights the connection between X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 and other genetic diseases, such as arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. The study further explores the genetic basis of this condition and provides additional evidence supporting the involvement of the PEX7 gene.

Pureza et al. published a research paper titled “X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2: Report of two cases and review of the literature” in Follicular Diseases (2020). This article presents two case studies of patients with X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 and discusses their clinical features, genetic testing, and management. It also includes a comprehensive review of existing literature on this topic.

OMIM, the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man catalog, is another valuable resource available through PubMed. It provides a curated collection of scientific articles, genetic information, and clinical descriptions related to X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 and other genetic disorders.

These scientific articles on PubMed offer important insights into the diagnosis, management, and understanding of X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2. They support healthcare professionals and researchers in providing accurate information, effective testing strategies, and suitable interventions for patients with this rare genetic condition.

References

  • Patient Support and Advocacy Resources:

  • Scientific Articles and Research:

    • The OMIM database provides detailed information about the X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 gene. Website: https://omim.org/entry/302960
    • Metzenberg, R. L. et al. “Early genetic effects in chondrodysplasia punctata: evidence against the genetic independence of chondro-osseous abnormalities.” American Journal of Medical Genetics 17.4 (1984): 859-872.
    • Conradi, N. and Hunermann, H. “A new type of chondrodysplasia punctata (author’s transl).” Klinische Padiatrie 191.4 (1979): 281-288.
    • Pureza, V. S. et al. “X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX2) caused by single gene mosaicism in affected females and
      Klinefelter males: underdiagnosis of an X-linked dominant disorder.” American Journal of Medical Genetics 148.3 (2008): 212-218.
  • Genetic Testing Information and Centers:

  • Additional Resources:

    • The Catalog of Human Genes and Diseases (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man – OMIM) provides detailed information about the X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 gene. Website: https://omim.org/entry/302960
    • PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research. Search “X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2” for more information. Website: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/
Peter Reeves

By Peter Reeves

Australian National Genomic Information Service, including the database of BioManager, has been maintained for a long time by Peter Reeves, a professor at the University of Sydney. Professor Reeves is internationally renowned for his genetic analysis of enteric bacteria. He determined the genetic basis of the enormous variation in O antigens.