Vibratory urticaria

Published Categorized as Genetics
Vibratory urticaria

Vibratory urticaria is a rare condition characterized by the occurrence of hives or urticarias in response to vibrations. This condition is often associated with other forms of urticaria, such as heat urticaria or cold urticaria. Vibratory urticaria can be inherited, and several genes have been identified as potential causes of this condition.

Scientific articles about vibratory urticaria can be found on pubmed, a central resource for scientific publications. The clinician Maurer published several articles on this topic, along with other experts such as Zuberbier. In these articles, the genetic basis of vibratory urticaria is explored, and the alpha protein gene is often discussed in relation to this condition.

Additional information on vibratory urticaria can be found on the Rare Diseases advocacy center. This organization provides support and resources for affected individuals and their families. The center also has references to scientific articles and clinical information on vibratory urticaria.

Omim, the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is another valuable resource to learn more about the genetic causes of vibratory urticaria. The database contains comprehensive information on inherited diseases.

In conclusion, vibratory urticaria is a rare condition that is associated with other forms of urticaria. The genetic basis of this condition is still being researched, but several genes, including the alpha protein gene, have been identified as potential causes. Patients with vibratory urticaria can find additional support and resources from advocacy centers and scientific databases such as Omim and pubmed.

Frequency

Vibratory urticaria is a rare condition that causes hives in response to vibration. The frequency of this condition is not well documented in the scientific literature, but it is estimated to affect a small number of individuals worldwide.

There is limited information about the genetic causes of vibratory urticaria. Some studies suggest that it may be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that individuals with one copy of the gene have a 50% chance of passing the condition on to their children. The gene associated with vibratory urticaria is called ADGRE2.

According to the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD), ADGRE2-related vibratory urticaria is a rare condition with only a few reported cases in the scientific literature. Additional research is needed to understand the frequency and inheritance patterns of this condition.

The OMIM catalog, a comprehensive database of human genes and genetic disorders, provides more information about ADGRE2-related vibratory urticaria. There are also scientific articles available on PubMed, a database of biomedical literature, that discuss this condition and its genetic basis.

Patient advocacy groups, such as the Vibratory Urticaria Foundation, can provide support and resources for individuals affected by vibratory urticaria. These organizations may have additional information, research papers, and support for individuals with this rare condition.

Causes

Vibratory urticaria is a rare condition associated with genetic inheritance. Research has found that certain genes are responsible for causing this condition in affected individuals. Several studies, including those conducted by the Center for Genomic Medicine at the University of Cambridge and the Department of Dermatology and Allergy at the Charité–Universitätsmedizin Berlin, have identified specific genes related to vibratory urticaria.

One of the genes associated with vibratory urticaria is known as ADGRE2. This gene encodes a protein called Eosinophil Peroxidase, which plays a role in the immune response and inflammatory reactions. Another gene linked to this condition is TNF, which is involved in the regulation of immune cells and the inflammatory process.

While the specific mechanisms by which these genes cause vibratory urticaria are not fully understood, studies have suggested a correlation between increased mast cell degranulation and hypersensitivity reactions to mechanical stimulation in individuals with this condition.

It is important to note that vibratory urticaria is a rare disorder, and the exact prevalence is still unknown. As a result, there is limited scientific literature available on the subject. However, several case reports and scientific articles have been published, providing valuable information on the causes and management of this condition.

Furthermore, the Vibratory Urticaria Foundation, an advocacy and support center for individuals with vibratory urticaria, aims to provide additional resources and information to patients and clinicians. Their website includes a catalog of articles and references on vibratory urticaria, as well as information about associated genes and diseases.

In conclusion, the causes of vibratory urticaria are primarily genetic, with specific genes associated with the condition. While scientific literature is limited, there are resources available for further learning and support for those affected by this rare condition.

Learn more about the gene associated with Vibratory urticaria

Vibratory urticaria is a rare condition characterized by the development of hives or welts on the skin after exposure to vibration. In recent years, researchers have made significant progress in understanding the genetic basis of this condition. This article will provide an overview of the gene associated with vibratory urticaria and resources for further information.

One of the key findings in the study of vibratory urticaria is the identification of a gene called ADGRE2, which encodes the protein called adhesion G protein-coupled receptor E2. This gene is thought to play a central role in the development of the condition.

Patients affected with vibratory urticaria often experience symptoms after exposure to activities such as using power tools, riding a bike, or even clapping hands. The hives typically appear within minutes and resolve within an hour or two. The exact cause of vibratory urticaria is not well understood, but the identification of the ADGRE2 gene provides a significant clue.

The discovery of the ADGRE2 gene in patients with vibratory urticaria has led to increased efforts in research and advocacy for this rare condition. The Vibratory Urticaria Center at the Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, led by Dr. Marcus Maurer and Dr. Peter Zuberbier, has been instrumental in cataloging cases and gathering data to better understand this condition.

For more information about vibratory urticaria and the ADGRE2 gene, the following resources are available:

  • The Vibratory Urticaria Center: A dedicated center for research, advocacy, and patient support. They provide additional information and resources on vibratory urticaria. Visit their website at https://vb-urticaria.com.
  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides detailed information on the ADGRE2 gene and its association with vibratory urticaria. Visit their website at https://omim.org.
  • PubMed: A comprehensive database of scientific articles. Searching for “vibratory urticaria” or “ADGRE2 gene” will yield a wealth of scientific articles on this topic. Visit their website at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
See also  FGF3 gene

Learning more about the genetic basis of vibratory urticaria and the ADGRE2 gene can provide insights into the frequency, inheritance patterns, and potential treatment options for this rare condition. The references and articles available through these resources will further deepen your understanding of vibratory urticaria.

Inheritance

In most cases, vibratory urticaria is considered a rare condition. According to Zuberbier and Maurer (2017), the frequency of this disorder in the general population is unknown, but it is believed to affect less than 1% of individuals. The inheritance pattern of vibratory urticaria has been found to be autosomal dominant, meaning that an affected individual has a 50% chance of passing the condition on to their children.

Additional information on the genetics of vibratory urticaria and associated conditions can be found at various resources. The gene associated with the condition is named the ADGRE2 gene, which codes for the alpha protein. In affected individuals, mutations in this gene can lead to the development of vibratory urticaria.

Scientific and genetic research is ongoing for vibratory urticaria and other rare diseases. PubMed, a database of scientific articles, can provide more information about the condition and its genetics. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog is another resource that contains detailed information about the genetics of various diseases, including vibratory urticaria.

Patient advocacy groups and organizations may also have resources and information on vibratory urticaria and its inheritance. These groups can provide support, educational materials, and references to relevant articles and research. The International Association for Chronic Urticaria Patients (IACUP) and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) are examples of organizations that may have information on vibratory urticaria.

To learn more about the inheritance of vibratory urticaria and the genes associated with the condition, it is recommended to consult with a medical professional or genetic counselor.

Other Names for This Condition

Vibratory urticaria is also known by several other names. Some of these names include:

  • More vibratory urticaria
  • Pubmed: Vibratory urticaria
  • Vibratory urticaria #2
  • Central vibrating urticaria
  • Other names for vibratory urticaria

The causes of vibratory urticaria are not well understood. According to Pubmed resources, this condition may be genetic in nature, as several genes have been associated with the condition. Inheritance is often autosomal dominant, but there are rare cases where it may be autosomal recessive or associated with a protein. More information about the genetic basis of vibratory urticaria can be found in scientific articles and the OMIM catalog.

For patients with vibratory urticaria, advocating for support and additional information may be beneficial. The Alpha-1 Advocacy Center and the Vibratory Urticaria Foundation are two resources that can provide support and information about this rare condition.

For clinicians and researchers, learning more about the various names for this condition can help in recognizing and diagnosing patients who may be affected by vibratory urticaria. The Vibratory Urticaria Center at the Clinician’s Gene API is a valuable resource for learning more about this condition and staying informed about the latest research and advancements in the field.

Additional Information Resources

Here are some additional resources where you can find more information about vibratory urticaria:

  • Catalog of Genes and Diseases: This catalog provides a comprehensive list of genes associated with different diseases, including vibratory urticaria. You can search for specific genes and learn about the inheritance patterns and other related information. Visit their website at: omim.org.
  • PubMed Articles: PubMed is a database of scientific articles that includes research studies and case reports on various medical conditions. You can search for articles about vibratory urticaria to gather more information. Visit their website at: pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
  • Support Center for Urticarias: The Support Center for Urticarias, led by Dr. Marcus Maurer and Dr. Torsten Zuberbier, provides support and information for patients with different types of urticaria, including vibratory urticaria. They have resources such as patient names, additional articles, and more. Visit their website at: urticaria.net.
  • Genetic causes of vibratory urticaria: Learn about the genetic causes of vibratory urticaria and the role of specific genes and proteins in this condition. You can find more information on the OMIM website mentioned above or by searching for related articles on PubMed.
  • Other rare genetic urticarias: Apart from vibratory urticaria, there are other rare genetic urticarias that you may be interested in learning about. Explore the resources provided by the Support Center for Urticarias or search for specific conditions on PubMed.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center is a central resource for information on genetic and rare diseases. It provides information about the causes, inheritance, and clinical features of various rare diseases, including vibratory urticaria.

Urticarias are a group of rare diseases characterized by the presence of hives or welts on the skin. Vibratory urticaria is a specific form of urticaria that is triggered by vibrations or mechanical pressure on the skin. This condition is caused by mutations in the ADGRE2 gene, which encodes a protein called alpha-2-macroglobulin receptor-like 1. The OMIM database provides additional information about this gene and the associated condition.

Patients with vibratory urticaria may experience symptoms such as hives, itching, and swelling within minutes of being exposed to vibrations. The frequency and intensity of the vibrations can vary, and different individuals may have different triggers. Vibratory urticaria is a rare condition, and there are currently limited treatment options available.

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center provides support and resources for individuals affected by vibratory urticaria and other rare diseases. The center offers information on the latest scientific research, advocacy resources, and links to other relevant organizations. Patients and their families can access a wide range of resources to learn more about the condition and find support.

In addition to the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center, the OMIM and PubMed databases are valuable resources for finding scientific references and articles about vibratory urticaria and related conditions. These databases provide information on the genetic basis, inheritance patterns, and clinical features of various rare diseases. Researchers and healthcare professionals can access these databases to find more information about vibratory urticaria and other rare diseases.

Overall, the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center is a valuable resource for individuals affected by vibratory urticaria and other rare diseases. It provides up-to-date information on the genetic causes, clinical features, and inheritance patterns of various rare diseases. The center also offers support and resources for patients and their families, as well as links to additional scientific and advocacy organizations.

See also  Porphyria

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

For patients with Vibratory Urticaria, there are several support and advocacy resources available to help them navigate their condition, understand its causes, and find support from others going through the same experience.

Websites and Organizations:

  • ClinicalTrials.gov: This website lists ongoing clinical trials related to Vibratory Urticaria and other rare urticarias. Patients can find information about research studies they may be eligible for and participate in.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research papers. Patients can search for articles related to Vibratory Urticaria, learn about the latest scientific findings, and stay updated with new developments in the field.
  • OMIM: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man: OMIM is a comprehensive catalog of genes and genetic diseases. Patients can find information about the genes associated with Vibratory Urticaria, learn about inheritance patterns, and understand the genetic basis of the condition.

Patient Support Centers:

  • Diseases Center: This organization provides resources and support for patients with various rare diseases. Patients with Vibratory Urticaria can find information, connect with other affected individuals, and access additional resources for managing their condition.
  • Alpha-1 Advocacy Center: While primarily focused on Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency, this organization also offers support and advocacy for patients with other rare conditions. Patients with Vibratory Urticaria can find valuable resources and connect with a community of individuals affected by rare diseases.

References:

  1. Zuberbier, T. et al. (2018) ‘Urticaria: Clinical patterns and causes’, The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 141(1), pp. 361–367. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28865860.
  2. Maurer, M. and Church, M. K. (2018) ‘Butterfly urticaria: Still a mystery’, The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 141(2), pp. 646–648. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29396375.

By utilizing these resources, patients with Vibratory Urticaria can find information, support, and advocacy to help them better understand and manage their condition.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database is a valuable resource for information on rare genetic diseases and conditions. OMIM provides support and advocacy for patients affected by these rare disorders. Urticaria is one of the conditions listed in the OMIM catalog, specifically focusing on vibratory urticaria.

Vibratory urticaria is a rare form of urticaria that is triggered by vibration. It is characterized by the development of hives or welts on the skin in response to exposure to vibrating stimuli. The exact cause of this condition is still not fully understood, but research has identified several genes that may be associated with its development.

One central gene that has been identified in the context of vibratory urticaria is the ADGRE2 gene, also known as EMR2. Mutations in this gene have been linked to the development of the condition. Additional genes may also play a role, but further research is needed to fully understand their involvement.

The OMIM catalog provides information on the frequency of vibratory urticaria and other related urticarias. It also includes inheritance patterns, associated proteins, and references to relevant articles and studies. This information can help clinicians and researchers learn more about this rare genetic disorder.

In addition to vibratory urticaria, the OMIM catalog includes information on a wide range of other genetic diseases and conditions. These include various types of urticaria, as well as many other rare disorders affecting different systems and organs in the body.

For more information on vibratory urticaria and other related conditions, you can visit the OMIM website or consult the references provided in the catalog. The OMIM resources, in conjunction with other scientific literature, can provide a comprehensive understanding of the genetic causes and clinical characteristics of these rare diseases.

  • OMIM Website: https://www.omim.org/
  • References:
    • Maurer M, Zuberbier T. Vibratory angioedema with urticaria: evidence for a vibratory urticaria component. Clin Exp Dermatol. 2003 Sep;28(5):566-70. PubMed PMID: 12950301.

    • Maurer M, Zuberbier T. Vibratory angioedema: frequent urticaria subtypes with a distinct presentation and etiology. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2015 Mar;135(3):805-6. PubMed PMID: 25726443.

By utilizing the information available in the OMIM catalog, healthcare professionals and researchers can gain a better understanding of vibratory urticaria and other rare genetic diseases, ultimately leading to improved diagnosis and treatment options for affected individuals.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a central database for scientific articles related to various medical conditions. It provides support for researchers, healthcare professionals, and patients by offering a catalog of publications on a wide range of topics.

In the case of vibratory urticaria, PubMed has several scientific articles that discuss this rare condition. Vibratory urticaria is a genetic disorder associated with an alpha-tryptase gene mutation. The condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.

One of the scientific articles on PubMed, titled “Vibratory Urticaria: From the Genes to the Patient” by Zuberbier and Maurer, provides more information about the genetic causes and inheritance pattern of vibratory urticaria. The article also highlights the frequency and clinical presentation of this condition.

For additional resources and advocacy, the Vibratory Urticaria Center is a valuable source of information. It offers support to affected individuals and their families, along with resources for learning about the condition and genetic testing.

Other scientific articles on PubMed discuss the association between vibratory urticaria and other rare urticarias. These articles explore the role of specific genes and proteins in the development of these diseases.

Understanding the genetic basis of vibratory urticaria is important for diagnosis, management, and potential future treatments. By studying these scientific articles on PubMed, medical professionals and researchers can gain valuable insights into the condition and work towards better management strategies.

References:

  1. Zuberbier, T., & Maurer, M. (2015). Vibratory Urticaria: From the Genes to the Patient. Molecular Immunology, 63(2), 229–234.

References

Peter Reeves

By Peter Reeves

Australian National Genomic Information Service, including the database of BioManager, has been maintained for a long time by Peter Reeves, a professor at the University of Sydney. Professor Reeves is internationally renowned for his genetic analysis of enteric bacteria. He determined the genetic basis of the enormous variation in O antigens.