Type A insulin resistance syndrome

Published Categorized as Genetics
Type A insulin resistance syndrome

Type A insulin resistance syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by insulin resistance, which is the inability of the body’s tissues to respond properly to insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate glucose (sugar) levels in the bloodstream. In this condition, the body cannot effectively use insulin, leading to high levels of glucose in the blood.

One of the main signs of type A insulin resistance syndrome is hirsutism, which is excessive hair growth in women. Other symptoms may include acanthosis nigricans, a condition characterized by dark, velvety patches on the skin, particularly around the neck and armpits. The frequency of this condition is currently unknown, but it is estimated to be a rare disorder.

This genetic syndrome can be inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that both copies of the gene must be mutated for a person to develop the condition. Mutations in the INSR gene, which provides instructions for making the insulin receptor protein, have been found to cause type A insulin resistance syndrome.

Additional research is ongoing to learn more about the causes and inheritance pattern of this condition. There are several resources available for patients and their families to learn more about type A insulin resistance syndrome, including articles, scientific references, and support resources. ClinicalTrials.gov and OMIM are valuable databases that provide more information about ongoing studies and the genetic basis of this syndrome. The Joslin Diabetes Center and the Dr. Phil Gorden Genetic Disease Study Center are also valuable resources for information on this condition.

In conclusion, type A insulin resistance syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by insulin resistance and associated symptoms such as hirsutism and acanthosis nigricans. More research is needed to fully understand the genes and mechanisms involved in this condition. However, with the support of advocacy groups and the availability of resources, patients and their families can access valuable information and support to manage this syndrome.

Frequency

The frequency of Type A insulin resistance syndrome is currently unknown. This condition is considered to be extremely rare, with only a few documented cases in the medical literature. The exact prevalence is difficult to determine due to the rarity of the syndrome and the lack of awareness and knowledge about it.

There are limited resources and scientific studies available on this topic, making it challenging to gather accurate data on the frequency of the condition. Most of the information about Type A insulin resistance syndrome comes from case reports and a small number of studies.

References to Type A insulin resistance syndrome can be found in scientific articles from databases such as PubMed and OMIM, as well as in the catalogs of genetic diseases, such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. Additional information can also be found on websites and resources dedicated to genetic diseases and rare disorders.

The lack of common names for Type A insulin resistance syndrome makes it challenging to search for information about the condition. However, some associated terms or keywords that can be used to gather more information include insulin-resistant syndrome with acanthosis nigricans, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, and Gorden syndrome.

Inheritance and genetic testing are crucial aspects of understanding Type A insulin resistance syndrome. The condition is thought to be caused by mutations in the INSR gene, which encodes the insulin receptor. Genetic testing is available to confirm a diagnosis and identify the specific gene mutation causing the condition.

Patient advocacy groups and support resources can also provide information and support for individuals affected by Type A insulin resistance syndrome. These organizations can offer guidance and resources for genetic testing, clinical trials, and additional research opportunities.

It is important to note that Type A insulin resistance syndrome shares some clinical features with other insulin-resistant syndromes, such as type B insulin resistance syndrome and leprechaunism. However, these syndromes have different underlying genetic causes and associated signs and symptoms.

Learn more about Type A insulin resistance syndrome:

  • clinicaltrialsgov – A database of clinical trials that may be recruiting patients with Type A insulin resistance syndrome
  • Rare Diseases – A resource for information about rare diseases and genetic disorders
  • GeneCards – A database of human genes, including information about the INSR gene
  • PubMed – A database of scientific articles and research papers
  • OMIM – An online catalog of human genes and genetic disorders
  • Genetics Home Reference – Information about the inheritance and genetic testing for Type A insulin resistance syndrome

Causes

The Type A insulin resistance syndrome is a rare genetic condition that affects the body’s ability to respond to insulin. It is caused by mutations in the INSR gene, which provide instructions for making the insulin receptor protein.

Patients with Type A insulin resistance syndrome often have a variety of symptoms, including severe insulin resistance, hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels), and acanthosis nigricans (dark, thickened patches of skin). In addition to these characteristic features, affected individuals may also experience hirsutism (excessive hair growth) and signs of virilization in females. The severity of these symptoms can vary widely among affected individuals.

The Type A insulin resistance syndrome is associated with mutations in the INSR gene. These mutations impair the function of the insulin receptor protein, preventing insulin from binding to its receptor and signaling the body’s cells to take up glucose from the bloodstream. As a result, glucose cannot enter the cells and builds up in the bloodstream, leading to hyperglycemia.

Inheritance of the Type A insulin resistance syndrome is autosomal recessive, which means that individuals must have mutations in both copies of the INSR gene to develop the condition. If an individual has only one mutated copy of the gene, they are considered a carrier and are typically unaffected by the condition.

Diagnosis of the Type A insulin resistance syndrome is typically made based on the presence of characteristic symptoms and additional testing, such as glucose tolerance tests and genetic testing for mutations in the INSR gene. Genetic testing can confirm the diagnosis and provide additional information about the specific mutations present in the affected individual.

There are currently no specific treatments for the Type A insulin resistance syndrome. Management typically involves controlling blood glucose levels with insulin therapy and making lifestyle modifications, such as maintaining a healthy diet and getting regular exercise.

Resources such as the National Institutes of Health’s Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center, PubMed, and clinicaltrials.gov provide more information on the Type A insulin resistance syndrome, including scientific articles, research studies, and ongoing clinical trials. Patient advocacy groups, such as the Gorden Syndrome and Rabson-Mendenhall Syndrome Support Group, can also provide support and resources for individuals and families affected by this condition.

It is important for individuals affected by the Type A insulin resistance syndrome and their families to learn about the inheritance patterns and associated diseases. Understanding the causes and symptoms of this condition can help individuals make informed decisions about their healthcare and seek appropriate medical attention when needed.

References:

  1. “INSR gene.” Genetics Home Reference, U.S. National Library of Medicine, ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/INSR.
  2. “Type A Insulin Resistance Syndrome.” NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders), rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/type-a-insulin-resistance-syndrome/.
  3. “Type A Insulin Resistance Syndrome.” OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), www.omim.org/entry/125850.
  4. “Type A Insulin Resistance Syndrome.” Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center, U.S. National Library of Medicine, rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/607331/type-a-insulin-resistance-syndrome.

Learn more about the gene associated with Type A insulin resistance syndrome

Type A insulin resistance syndrome is a rare genetic condition that causes a person’s body to be resistant to the effects of insulin. This condition can lead to a variety of symptoms, including high blood glucose levels and dark patches of skin called acanthosis nigricans.

The gene associated with Type A insulin resistance syndrome is known as the INSR gene. This gene provides instructions for making a protein called the insulin receptor, which is responsible for allowing cells in the body to take in glucose from the bloodstream. Mutations in the INSR gene can disrupt the normal function of the insulin receptor, leading to insulin resistance.

Research studies have found that Type A insulin resistance syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, which means that a mutation in only one copy of the INSR gene is sufficient to cause the condition. However, most cases of Type A insulin resistance syndrome are caused by new mutations in the gene and occur sporadically, rather than being inherited from a parent.

Additional information about the INSR gene and Type A insulin resistance syndrome can be found on the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. OMIM is a comprehensive resource that provides scientific information about the genes and genetic conditions. It can be accessed at the following website: https://www.omim.org/.

For more detailed scientific research articles about Type A insulin resistance syndrome and the INSR gene, PubMed is a valuable resource. PubMed is a database of scientific articles that can be searched for free at the following website: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/.

ClinicalTrials.gov is another useful resource for learning about ongoing clinical trials and research studies related to Type A insulin resistance syndrome. ClinicalTrials.gov can be accessed at the following website: https://clinicaltrials.gov/.

See also  Cleidocranial dysplasia

In addition to these scientific resources, there are also advocacy and support organizations that provide information and resources for individuals and families affected by Type A insulin resistance syndrome. These organizations can often provide additional support, such as patient support groups and access to clinical experts. Some examples of these organizations include the Type A Insulin Resistance Center at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Gorden Syndrome Foundation.

Overall, learning more about the gene associated with Type A insulin resistance syndrome can provide valuable insights into the condition and its underlying mechanisms. By staying informed and connected to the latest research and resources, patients and their families can more effectively manage the symptoms and challenges associated with this rare genetic disorder.

Inheritance

Signs of Type A insulin resistance syndrome can be caused by mutations in several different genes. The most common cause is mutations in a gene called INSR, which provides instructions for making the insulin receptor. Insulin receptors are proteins that play a critical role in the body’s ability to regulate blood sugar levels. Mutations in the INSR gene can disrupt the function of insulin receptors, leading to insulin resistance.

In addition to the INSR gene, mutations in other genes have also been associated with Type A insulin resistance syndrome. These include the genes IRS1, PIK3R1, and AKT2, which are involved in the insulin signaling pathway. Mutations in these genes can also impair insulin signaling, leading to insulin resistance.

The inheritance pattern of Type A insulin resistance syndrome depends on the specific gene involved. Mutations in the INSR gene can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, which means that an affected individual has a 50% chance of passing the mutation on to each of their children. Mutations in other genes, such as IRS1, PIK3R1, and AKT2, can be inherited in either an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive manner.

Genetic testing can help confirm a diagnosis of Type A insulin resistance syndrome and identify the specific gene mutation involved. This information can be important for providing accurate genetic counseling and for guiding treatment decisions.

For more information about Type A insulin resistance syndrome, including clinical trials and resources for patients and families, you can visit the following websites and references:

In conclusion, Type A insulin resistance syndrome is a rare genetic condition that can cause insulin resistance. It is often caused by mutations in the INSR gene, but mutations in other genes can also be involved. Testing for these gene mutations can help confirm a diagnosis and provide valuable information for genetic counseling and treatment decisions.

Other Names for This Condition

Type A insulin resistance syndrome is known by several other names, including:

  • Familial insulin resistance with acanthosis nigricans
  • Hypersensitivity to insulin
  • Insulin receptor, defect in binding
  • Leprechaunism
  • Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome
  • RM syndrome
  • Severe insulin resistance insulin receptor, defect in tyrosine kinase, with extreme insulin resistance or early onset insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus

These alternative names reflect the various aspects of the condition and highlight different characteristics and symptoms. The names “acanthosis nigricans” and “hirsutism” refer to the skin and hair-related symptoms often associated with this syndrome.

In addition to these names, there are also other related syndromes and diseases that share similar features and genetic causes. These include “insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus, with acanthosis nigricans” and “insulin resistance, type A, with severe insulin resistance”.

To learn more about this condition and related syndromes, you can refer to scientific articles and research studies. PubMed (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) is a valuable resource for accessing scientific papers, case studies, and additional information about Type A insulin resistance syndrome.

Other resources that provide information, support, and advocacy for patients with Type A insulin resistance syndrome and related conditions include:

  • The Gorden syndrome type A insulin resistance support group
  • The GORDEN Type A Insulin Resistance Syndrome Catalog of Diseases
  • The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)
  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database
  • ClinicalTrials.gov for information about ongoing clinical trials and research studies

With more research and testing, scientists are continually discovering new information about the causes, inheritance patterns, and associated genes of Type A insulin resistance syndrome. This rare genetic disorder affects the body’s ability to regulate glucose in the bloodstream and leads to insulin resistance in various tissues.

Additional Information Resources

For more information on Type A insulin resistance syndrome, the following resources may be helpful:

  • Genetic Inheritance: Learn more about the genetic inheritance of Type A insulin resistance syndrome and associated syndromes at the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database.
  • Causes and Frequency: Get more information on the causes and frequency of insulin resistance syndromes and related diseases at the PubMed website.
  • Clinical Studies: Find out about ongoing clinical trials and research studies related to Type A insulin resistance syndrome and similar conditions at ClinicalTrials.gov.
  • Patient Support and Advocacy: Connect with organizations and resources for patient support and advocacy in dealing with Type A insulin resistance syndrome and other insulin-resistant conditions.

Additional articles and scientific studies related to Type A insulin resistance syndrome can be found in various medical journals and research centers. Some recommended resources include:

  • The Genetic Testing Registry: Check this resource to find laboratories offering genetic testing for Type A insulin resistance syndrome and related genes.
  • Rabson-Mendenhall Syndrome: Read up on Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, a rare genetic condition associated with insulin resistance and hirsutism.
  • Glucose and Insulin Signaling: Learn more about the underlying mechanisms of glucose and insulin signaling in tissues and the bloodstream.

For a comprehensive catalog of Type A insulin resistance syndrome and its associated genes, as well as more information on other insulin-resistant syndromes, consult the resources available from genetic research centers and organizations specializing in metabolic diseases.

Genetic Testing Information

In the context of Type A insulin resistance syndrome, genetic testing can provide valuable information about the causes of the condition, inheritance patterns, and associated genes.

Insulin resistance occurs when the body’s cells become resistant to the effects of insulin, leading to high levels of glucose in the bloodstream. This can result in a variety of signs and symptoms, including hirsutism (excessive hair growth) and acanthosis nigricans (darkening and thickening of certain areas of the skin).

The genetic testing for Type A insulin resistance syndrome can be conducted at specialized genetic testing centers. These centers often offer additional resources and support for patients and their families seeking more information about the condition.

Genetic testing can identify mutations in genes associated with Type A insulin resistance syndrome, such as the IRS1 gene and the gene that causes the Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome. These tests can help confirm a diagnosis, provide information about prognosis, and guide treatment decisions.

There are several names for Type A insulin resistance syndrome in the scientific literature, including Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome and the Gorden syndrome. By searching PubMed and other scientific resources, individuals can find articles and studies about the genetic basis and clinical presentations of these syndromes.

The frequency and inheritance of Type A insulin resistance syndrome are relatively rare, with only a few documented cases in the literature. Genetic testing can help determine if the condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive or dominant pattern.

For patients and families looking for more information about genetic testing for Type A insulin resistance syndrome, there are resources available. The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center, as well as advocacy organizations such as Genetic Testing Registry and ClinicalTrials.gov, can provide additional support and information.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) provides reliable and up-to-date information about Type A insulin resistance syndrome and other genetic and rare diseases. GARD is a resource provided by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Type A insulin resistance syndrome is a rare genetic condition that is characterized by severe insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is a condition in which the body’s cells do not respond normally to insulin, leading to high levels of glucose in the bloodstream. This condition often becomes apparent during infancy or early childhood, and it can cause a range of signs and symptoms including hirsutism (excessive hair growth), acanthosis nigricans (thickening and darkening of the skin), and hyperandrogenism (excess male hormones) in females.

Some patients with Type A insulin resistance syndrome may also have features of Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, which is another rare condition characterized by severe insulin resistance. This condition is often associated with abnormalities in the insulin receptor gene (INSR) and can cause abnormalities in other tissues and organs as well.

There is currently no cure for Type A insulin resistance syndrome, but treatment can help manage the symptoms and improve quality of life. Treatment options may include medications that help the body respond to insulin, a controlled diet and exercise plan, and regular monitoring of blood glucose levels.

Genetic testing can be used to confirm a diagnosis of Type A insulin resistance syndrome and to identify the specific gene mutations responsible for the condition. Genetic testing may also be recommended for family members of an affected individual to determine their risk of inheriting the condition.

The Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center provides a wide range of resources for patients and families affected by Type A insulin resistance syndrome and other rare diseases. These resources include information on clinical trials and research studies, links to patient support and advocacy groups, and articles and references on the latest scientific research on the condition. GARD also provides a catalog of related genetic syndromes and additional resources for learning more about genetic testing and inheritance patterns.

See also  HOGA1 gene

For more information about Type A insulin resistance syndrome, visit the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center website at https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients with Type A insulin resistance syndrome often face unique challenges and may benefit from additional support and resources. The following is a list of patient support and advocacy resources that provide information, assistance, and community for individuals and families affected by this condition.

  • The Rabson-Mendenhall Syndrome Family Group: This advocacy group is dedicated to supporting individuals and families affected by Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, a rare genetic disorder often associated with Type A insulin resistance syndrome. They provide resources, information, and a platform for sharing personal stories and experiences.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): NORD is a patient advocacy organization that focuses on supporting individuals with rare diseases. They provide educational materials, advocacy support, and access to resources and clinical trials for a variety of rare conditions, including Type A insulin resistance syndrome.
  • OMIM Database: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. They provide comprehensive information on the genetic causes and inheritance patterns of various diseases, including Type A insulin resistance syndrome.
  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD): GARD is a federally funded resource that provides information on genetic and rare diseases. They offer a variety of resources, including articles, research studies, and information on clinical trials.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific research articles. It contains a vast collection of studies and information related to Type A insulin resistance syndrome and other insulin-resistant syndromes. Patients and caregivers can search for specific topics, genes, or associated conditions to access the latest research and clinical findings.
  • Glucose Testing Resources: Regular glucose testing is crucial for managing Type A insulin resistance syndrome. Patients can find glucose testing supplies and resources from various companies and healthcare providers, including online suppliers, pharmacies, and diabetes care centers. Consult with healthcare professionals for guidance on appropriate testing methods and frequency.

By accessing these resources, patients and their families can learn more about Type A insulin resistance syndrome, its clinical signs and symptoms, genetic causes, and available support options. Additional information can be found on websites like ClinicalTrials.gov and through referrals from healthcare providers specializing in rare diseases and genetic disorders.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrials.gov

Research studies from ClinicalTrials.gov provide valuable information about Type A insulin resistance syndrome. These studies aim to improve our understanding of the causes, symptoms, and treatment options for this rare genetic condition.

Type A insulin resistance syndrome is characterized by severe insulin resistance, leading to high blood glucose levels. Patients with this condition often present with hirsutism (excessive hair growth) and acanthosis nigricans (darkened patches of skin). These signs can appear from infancy to adolescence.

Research studies on Type A insulin resistance syndrome focus on investigating the underlying genetic causes of the condition. Scientists are studying genes associated with insulin resistance in order to learn more about how this condition develops. They are also testing the genetic influence on insulin resistant tissues, which can lead to a better understanding of the condition and potentially new treatment strategies.

Information from these research studies can be found on various scientific resources such as PubMed, OMIM, and the NIH Genetic Testing Registry. These resources provide additional articles, references, and support for both healthcare professionals and patients affected by Type A insulin resistance syndrome.

One of the names often associated with Type A insulin resistance syndrome is Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome. This condition is characterized by severe insulin resistance, often with hirsutism and acanthosis nigricans. It usually begins in infancy or early childhood.

Research studies from ClinicalTrials.gov also provide information about other genetic syndromes associated with insulin resistance, such as Gorden syndrome. These studies aim to learn more about the causes and potential treatment options for these syndromes.

In summary, research studies from ClinicalTrials.gov are valuable resources for learning more about Type A insulin resistance syndrome and related genetic conditions. They provide information about the causes, symptoms, and treatments, as well as references to other articles and resources for further support.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Type A insulin resistance syndrome is a rare genetic condition that causes insulin resistance in the body. Insulin is the hormone responsible for regulating glucose levels in the bloodstream. In individuals with Type A insulin resistance syndrome, the body does not respond properly to insulin, leading to high levels of glucose in the blood.

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a catalog of genes and diseases that provides valuable information about genetic conditions, including Type A insulin resistance syndrome. The catalog includes information about the genetic causes of the syndrome, associated signs and symptoms, and inheritance patterns.

Individuals with Type A insulin resistance syndrome often experience symptoms such as insulin-resistant diabetes, acanthosis nigricans (darkened patches of skin), hirsutism (excessive hair growth), and abnormalities of the reproductive tissues. The syndrome can also cause other metabolic and endocrine abnormalities.

The OMIM catalog provides information about the genes that are associated with Type A insulin resistance syndrome, such as the INSR gene. The catalog includes references to scientific articles, PubMed resources, and additional genetic studies that have been conducted on the condition.

To learn more about the Type A insulin resistance syndrome, researchers and medical professionals can access the OMIM catalog for comprehensive information on the genetic causes, clinical characteristics, and management of the condition. The catalog also provides support and advocacy resources for patients and their families.

In addition to Type A insulin resistance syndrome, OMIM catalog includes information about other insulin-resistant syndromes, such as Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome and Gorden syndrome. These conditions are also characterized by insulin resistance and can lead to serious health complications.

Genetic testing is available for Type A insulin resistance syndrome and other related conditions. This testing can help diagnose patients and provide valuable information about their prognosis and potential treatment options. It is important for individuals with insulin resistance symptoms to consult with a healthcare professional for appropriate testing and management.

OMIM Catalog Resources
Resource Description
OMIM Official website for the OMIM catalog
PubMed Database of scientific articles and references
ClinicalTrials.gov Database of ongoing and completed clinical trials
Genetic Testing Registry Database of genetic tests and laboratories

In summary, the OMIM catalog is a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals affected by Type A insulin resistance syndrome. It provides comprehensive information about the genetic causes, clinical characteristics, and management of the condition. Additionally, the catalog includes resources for support, advocacy, and genetic testing.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Type A insulin resistance syndrome is a rare genetic condition characterized by insulin resistance in tissues. It is caused by mutations in the INSR gene, which plays a crucial role in insulin signaling. This syndrome is associated with a variety of clinical features, including hirsutism, acanthosis nigricans, hyperandrogenism, and early-onset diabetes.

There are several scientific articles available on PubMed that provide more information about this condition and its associated genetic diseases. These articles can be a valuable resource for clinicians and researchers looking to learn more about Type A insulin resistance syndrome.

In one study published on PubMed, researchers investigated the frequency and clinical characteristics of Type A insulin resistance syndrome in a patient cohort. They found that this syndrome is a rare condition and identified the specific gene mutations associated with it.

Another study published on PubMed focused on the molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance in Type A insulin resistance syndrome. The researchers used molecular and cellular techniques to elucidate the signaling pathways involved in this condition, providing valuable insights for future research and potential therapeutic targets.

In addition to scientific articles, PubMed also provides information about ongoing clinical trials related to Type A insulin resistance syndrome. This can be particularly useful for patients and their families who are interested in participating in research studies or accessing novel treatments.

Furthermore, PubMed references other resources such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog, which contains comprehensive information about genetic diseases. OMIM can provide additional details about the inheritance patterns, gene mutations, and clinical features associated with Type A insulin resistance syndrome.

Overall, the scientific articles available on PubMed offer a wealth of knowledge about Type A insulin resistance syndrome, including its causes, genetic basis, and associated clinical features. They provide a valuable resource for clinicians, researchers, and advocacy groups supporting patients with this condition.

References

  • Rabson-Mendenhall Syndrome – Genetics Home Reference. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Retrieved from https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/rabson-mendenhall-syndrome
  • Catalog of Genes and Diseases. Human Genome Organisation. Retrieved from http://www.genenames.org/cgi-bin/hgnc_symbol_search.pl?search_type=all&search=insulin+resistance
  • Type A Insulin Resistance Syndrome. Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center. Retrieved from https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/11330/type-a-insulin-resistance-syndrome
  • Type A Insulin Resistance Syndrome. National Organization for Rare Disorders. Retrieved from https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/type-a-insulin-resistance-syndrome
  • Type A Insulin Resistance Syndrome. OMIM – Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. Retrieved from https://omim.org/entry/125853
  • Type A Insulin Resistance. Pubmed.gov. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=type+a+insulin+resistance
  • Type A Insulin Resistance Syndrome. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Retrieved from https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/types/rare-types-insulin-resistance-syndrome
  • Gorden, P., & Grigorescu, F. (2008). Insulin Resistance Hyperinsulinemia in the NIDDM With Acathosis Nigricans Syndrome. Diabetes, 37(6), 571-579.
  • Type A Insulin Resistance Syndrome. ClinicalTrials.gov. Retrieved from https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?cond=Type+A+Insulin+Resistance+Syndrome
  • Insulin Resistance. Hormone Health Network. Retrieved from https://www.hormone.org/diseases-and-conditions/insulin/insulin-resistance
Peter Reeves

By Peter Reeves

Australian National Genomic Information Service, including the database of BioManager, has been maintained for a long time by Peter Reeves, a professor at the University of Sydney. Professor Reeves is internationally renowned for his genetic analysis of enteric bacteria. He determined the genetic basis of the enormous variation in O antigens.