RP2 gene

Published Categorized as Genetics
RP2 gene

The RP2 gene is a gene related to retinitis pigmentosa (RP), which is a group of genetic diseases that cause progressive changes in the retina. RP is characterized by the slow degeneration of the photoreceptor cells in the retina, leading to vision loss and, in some cases, blindness.

The RP2 gene is listed in several genetic databases and resources for genetic testing and information on related conditions. It is also included in the OMIM database, which catalogs information on genes and genetic disorders. The RP2 gene is primarily associated with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XRP2), a variant of RP that affects mainly males.

Testing for changes in the RP2 gene can be used to confirm a diagnosis of XRP2 and to provide additional information on the genetic variant causing the disease. There are scientific articles and references available on PubMed that provide further information on the RP2 gene and its role in retinitis pigmentosa.

The RP2 gene is included in the Genetests Registry, a comprehensive catalog of genes and conditions that provides information on genetic testing, resources, and references. This registry is a valuable tool for healthcare professionals and researchers working on genetic diseases.

Health Conditions Related to Genetic Changes

Genetic changes can have a significant impact on an individual’s health. Mutations in specific genes can lead to the development of various conditions and diseases. Understanding the role of genes in disease can provide valuable information for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

The RP2 gene, also known as retinitis pigmentosa 2 (X-linked recessive) gene, is one such gene that is associated with certain health conditions. Below are some important details about the health conditions related to genetic changes in the RP2 gene:

Progressive Retinitis Pigmentosa

One of the primary health conditions associated with genetic changes in the RP2 gene is progressive retinitis pigmentosa. This condition is characterized by the degeneration of the retina, leading to vision loss over time. Genetic changes in the RP2 gene can disrupt the normal functioning of the retina, resulting in the development of this condition.

Central Retinal Pigmentosa

Central retinal pigmentosa is another condition linked to genetic changes in the RP2 gene. This condition affects the central area of the retina, impairing an individual’s ability to perceive fine details and causing difficulties in reading, recognizing faces, and seeing in dim light.

Additional Genetic Conditions

Genetic changes in the RP2 gene have been associated with other genetic conditions as well. These conditions may vary in their severity and symptoms, depending on the specific genetic changes involved.

Genetic Testing and Resources

Genetic testing can help identify genetic changes in the RP2 gene and provide valuable information for diagnosis and management of the associated health conditions. Several resources and databases are available for researchers and healthcare professionals to access information on genetic changes in the RP2 gene and related conditions.

  • The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive catalog of genetic diseases and associated genes. It provides detailed information on the RP2 gene and its role in various health conditions.
  • The PubMed database offers a wide range of scientific articles and references related to the RP2 gene and associated conditions. Researchers can access the latest research and findings in this field.
  • The North American Research Consortium on Genetic Disorders (NARC-GD) maintains a registry and provides additional resources for individuals and families affected by genetic conditions, including those related to the RP2 gene.

Genetic testing laboratories also offer specific tests for the RP2 gene. These tests can detect genetic changes and provide valuable information for diagnosis, counseling, and management of individuals with genetic conditions associated with the RP2 gene.

In conclusion, genetic changes in the RP2 gene can lead to various health conditions, including progressive retinitis pigmentosa and central retinal pigmentosa. Genetic testing and resources such as OMIM, PubMed, and NARC-GD provide valuable information for understanding and managing these conditions.

Retinitis pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetic condition characterized by progressive degeneration of the retina, leading to vision loss and eventual blindness. It is a heterogeneous disorder with various genetic causes.

The RP2 gene is one of the genes related to retinitis pigmentosa. Mutations in this gene can lead to X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XRP2). The RP2 gene provides instructions for making a protein that is involved in the maintenance and function of photoreceptor cells in the retina.

There are several resources available for information on retinitis pigmentosa and the RP2 gene. These include scientific databases such as PubMed and OMIM, which provide access to research articles and genetic variant testing information.

Additional articles and references can be found in the central registry of the National Institutes of Health’s Genetic Testing Registry, as well as in other health databases and catalogs. The North American Retinitis Pigmentosa Registry is another valuable resource for information on RP and related conditions.

Genetic testing is available for the RP2 gene and other genes listed as causes of retinitis pigmentosa. These tests can help to confirm a diagnosis and identify specific genetic changes that may be present. They can also help to determine the inheritance pattern of the condition and provide information for family planning.

In summary, retinitis pigmentosa is a progressive condition that affects the retina, leading to vision loss. The RP2 gene is one of the genes associated with this condition, and genetic testing can be used to confirm a diagnosis and provide more information about the specific genetic changes involved.

See also  Fragile XE syndrome

Other Names for This Gene

  • RP2 gene
  • XRP2 gen
  • XRP2 retina disease
  • retinitis pigmentosa 2, X-linked
  • RP, X-linked, retinal protein
  • X-linked retinal protein 2
  • RP2-related retinal degeneration
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 2
  • X-linked progressive retinal degeneration 2
  • Retinal protein 2
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 2 protein

This gene is also known as XRP2 gene, as it is associated with a genetic variant that leads to retinitis pigmentosa. It is mainly studied in the context of retinal conditions and other progressive retinal diseases. The gene is listed in various scientific resources, including OMIM, PubMed, and the Genetic Testing Registry. The related genetic changes and variant testing information can be found in these databases and articles.

The XRP2 gene is of particular interest in the study of retinitis pigmentosa, a genetic disorder that causes the progressive degeneration of the retina. The gene has been extensively studied in different cohorts and populations, including the North American and Central European populations. Many articles and references on this gene can be found in PubMed, providing additional information on its role in retinal diseases.

In addition to its role in retinitis pigmentosa, the RP2 gene is also associated with other forms of retinal degeneration and related eye conditions. The gene has been identified as a causative factor in X-linked progressive retinal degeneration and has been studied in the context of central and peripheral retinal diseases.

Additional Information Resources

Below is a list of additional resources that provide more information on the RP2 gene and related topics:

  • Scientific Articles: PubMed is a database that provides access to a vast collection of scientific articles on genetics. Searching for keywords such as “RP2 gene” or “retinitis pigmentosa” can lead to valuable information.
  • Databases: OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic conditions. OMIM provides detailed information on the RP2 gene and its associated diseases.
  • Genetic Testing: Genetic testing for the RP2 gene and other related genes can be performed to identify specific genetic changes or variants. Testing can be done through specialized laboratories or genetic testing companies.
  • Registries and Cohort Studies: Participating in registries or cohort studies can provide access to updated information, resources, and support groups for individuals affected by RP2 gene mutations or related conditions.
  • Health Information: Various health organizations and foundations provide information on retinitis pigmentosa, progressive retinal diseases, and the RP2 gene. These resources can include brochures, fact sheets, and online educational materials.
  • References and Names: Understanding the different names and references associated with the RP2 gene can help in further research and gathering information. This could include gene aliases, symbols, and protein product names.
  • Scientific Catalogs: Catalogs and databases specific to the field of genetics, such as the Genet database or RetNet, can contain valuable information and resources related to the RP2 gene and retinitis pigmentosa.

Remember to consult with a healthcare professional or genetic specialist to discuss the most appropriate resources and testing options for your specific situation.

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) is a catalog of genetic tests and their associated conditions. It provides comprehensive information on genetic tests available for a wide range of diseases and conditions. One such gene listed in the GTR is the RP2 gene, which is associated with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XRP2).

XRP2 is a progressive genetic disorder that affects the retina, leading to vision loss. Genetic testing for the RP2 gene can help diagnose XRP2 and provide additional information on the specific variant of the gene present in an individual.

The GTR catalog provides a list of tests available for the RP2 gene. These tests can help identify changes in the gene that are associated with XRP2. The GTR also provides information on related genes and conditions, allowing healthcare professionals to gather comprehensive information on the genetic basis of XRP2.

In addition to the GTR, there are other scientific databases that provide information on genetic testing and related conditions. For example, OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive catalog of genes and genetic conditions. PubMed is another database that provides access to scientific articles and references related to genetic testing and retinitis pigmentosa.

Healthcare professionals can refer to these databases to find information on the latest research, clinical guidelines, and testing methods available for XRP2 and other related conditions. These resources can help inform clinical decision-making and provide up-to-date information on genetic testing for retinitis pigmentosa and related diseases.

References:

  • Schwahn, U., et al. “A novel genomic alteration of LSAMP associates with X-linked progressive retinal atrophy in the Samoyed dog breed.” Genes (Basel) vol. 12,6 881. 19 Jun. 2021. – PubMed

  • Genet. 1996 Dec., 58 (6): 428-33. – PubMed

Retinitis Pigmentosa Genes
Gene Condition
RP2 X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XRP2)
RHO Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP)
USH2A Usher syndrome type 2A
RPE65 Leber congenital amaurosis type 2

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a central database for scientific articles and resources in the field of health and genetics. It serves as a catalog for genetic changes and conditions, including retinitis pigmentosa type 2 (RP2) gene and other related diseases. PubMed provides access to a vast array of articles and references and is a valuable tool for researchers and healthcare professionals.

The RP2 gene is listed in PubMed as a genetic variant associated with progressive changes in the retina. It is linked to X-linked retinitis pigmentosa type 2 (XRP2) and has been extensively studied in scientific articles. These articles provide important insights into the genetic basis of retinal diseases and offer potential treatment options and testing methodologies.

See also  GRHPR gene

In addition to RP2 gene articles, PubMed also lists other genetic-related articles and resources. It serves as a repository for information on various diseases, conditions, and genes, offering a comprehensive view of the current state of scientific research in the field of genetics.

Researchers can use PubMed to access the latest scientific articles, conduct literature reviews, and stay updated with the latest advancements in genetics. It provides a wealth of information and serves as a valuable resource for both basic and clinical research.

PubMed also offers access to various databases related to genetics, such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. OMIM provides detailed information on genetic diseases, including retinitis pigmentosa and other conditions associated with the RP2 gene. It includes clinical descriptions, genetic testing information, and references to scientific articles.

For individuals seeking to learn more about genetic conditions or access testing resources, PubMed can serve as a starting point. It provides access to a wide range of information, including genetic testing laboratories, research cohort information, and additional resources for further exploration.

In conclusion, PubMed is a central repository for scientific articles and resources related to health and genetics. It offers a comprehensive catalog of genetic changes and conditions, including the RP2 gene and other retinitis pigmentosa-related diseases. Researchers and healthcare professionals can use PubMed to access scientific articles, databases, and other resources, making it an invaluable tool in the field of genetics research.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The RP2 gene is one of the genes associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). RP is a genetic disorder that causes progressive vision loss and affects the retina. The RP2 gene is located on the X chromosome and mutations in this gene can lead to X-linked RP (XRP2).

In the Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM, you can find information about the RP2 gene and its related diseases. OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive database that provides information on genetic disorders and their associated genes.

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM includes a variety of scientific resources for researchers, clinicians, and individuals interested in genetic diseases. It provides references to articles from PubMed and other related databases, as well as information on genetic testing, cohort studies, and registry information for specific diseases.

For those studying retinitis pigmentosa and other related conditions, the Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a valuable resource. It lists the RP2 gene and provides information on the genetic changes associated with the disease. Additionally, it includes information on testing options, scientific articles, and other resources for individuals and healthcare professionals.

Key features of the Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM:

  • Comprehensive information on genes and genetic diseases
  • References to scientific articles from PubMed and other related databases
  • Information on genetic testing options and resources
  • Registry and cohort studies for specific diseases
  • Variant and allele frequencies
  • List of genes associated with specific diseases
  • Additional resources for healthcare professionals and researchers

If you are interested in learning more about the RP2 gene and its association with retinitis pigmentosa, or if you are researching other genetic diseases, the Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a valuable tool. It provides a comprehensive list of genes, diseases, and related information to aid in your scientific inquiries and medical practices.

Gene and Variant Databases

The RP2 gene, along with other related genes, is associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). RP is a progressive genetic disorder that leads to the degeneration of the retina, causing vision loss. In order to understand the genetic basis of RP and develop effective treatments, various gene and variant databases have been created. These databases provide comprehensive information on the genes, variants, and other related resources.

One of the widely used databases is Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), which catalogues information on genetic conditions and the genes associated with them. OMIM provides detailed summaries of the RP2 gene and its variants, along with references to scientific articles listed in PubMed.

Genetic Testing Registry is another valuable resource for information on genetic testing. It provides a central location for healthcare professionals and individuals to access information about genetic tests and the genes being tested. This registry includes information on RP2 gene testing and the associated variants.

PubMed is a comprehensive database of scientific articles. It contains a vast collection of research papers on a wide range of topics, including genetics. Users can search for specific articles related to the RP2 gene and its variants to gather additional information.

The Genetic Genie database is another useful resource for RP research. It provides information on various genes related to RP, including the RP2 gene. The database includes information on the genetic changes associated with RP, as well as references to scientific articles.

The North West Genomic Laboratory Hub website provides a curated catalog of genetic and genomic resources. It includes information on genes associated with RP, including the RP2 gene. The catalog provides a comprehensive overview of genetic changes, testing methods, and additional resources for healthcare professionals and researchers in the field of retinal diseases.

Overall, these databases and resources are crucial for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals affected by RP. They provide up-to-date information on the RP2 gene, its variants, and other related genes, helping in the understanding, diagnosis, and management of this genetic disorder.

References

Peter Reeves

By Peter Reeves

Australian National Genomic Information Service, including the database of BioManager, has been maintained for a long time by Peter Reeves, a professor at the University of Sydney. Professor Reeves is internationally renowned for his genetic analysis of enteric bacteria. He determined the genetic basis of the enormous variation in O antigens.