RAB27A gene

Published Categorized as Genetics
RAB27A gene

The RAB27A gene is involved in the regulation of melanosome transport and the release of proteins from these specialized organelles. It encodes a protein called RAB27A, which is a member of the RAS oncogene family. Mutations in this gene can lead to a shortage of functional RAB27A, resulting in a condition known as Griscelli syndrome. Griscelli syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution of the skin and hair, as well as immune system abnormalities, including impaired T-lymphocyte function.

Within the RAB27A gene, there are several variants that have been identified and cataloged. These changes can have different effects on the function of the RAB27A protein, and therefore can cause a range of related conditions and diseases. Several scientific articles and resources can provide more information on the specific variants of the RAB27A gene and their associated diseases.

Testing for mutations in the RAB27A gene can be done through genetic testing laboratories and registries. These tests can provide valuable information about the presence of variants in the gene and their potential effects on health. Additionally, databases such as OMIM and PubMed contain related articles and references on the RAB27A gene and its associated conditions and diseases.

Further research on the RAB27A gene and its function is necessary to fully understand its role in melanosome transport and protein release. This knowledge could lead to a better understanding of certain diseases and conditions that are related to RAB27A mutations. It could also provide new insights into the development of diagnostic tests and therapeutic strategies targeting the RAB27A gene and its related proteins.

Health Conditions Related to Genetic Changes

Genetic changes in the RAB27A gene can lead to various health conditions and diseases. The RAB27A gene provides instructions for making a protein called RAB27A, which is part of a complex system involved in the transport and delivery of information within cells. Changes in this gene can disrupt the normal function of RAB27A and result in a range of health conditions.

One example of a condition related to genetic changes in the RAB27A gene is Griscelli syndrome. This rare genetic disorder affects the coloring of the hair, skin, and eyes. The RAB27A gene variant causes a shortage of RAB27A protein in certain cells, resulting in the abnormal distribution of melanosomes, which are responsible for pigmentation. As a result, affected individuals typically have silvery-gray hair, pale skin, and light-colored eyes.

In addition to Griscelli syndrome, changes in the RAB27A gene have been associated with other diseases and conditions. For example, mutations in RAB27A can contribute to immunodeficiency and problems with the immune system’s ability to fight off infections. It has also been linked to neurological disorders such as myo5a disease, which affects the development and function of muscles.

When evaluating genetic changes in the RAB27A gene, healthcare professionals often rely on various databases and resources for additional information. These include the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database, PubMed for scientific articles, and gene testing resources. These tools provide comprehensive information on the genetic changes, their associated health conditions, and references to relevant research articles.

Genetic testing for changes in the RAB27A gene can be conducted to confirm a diagnosis or assess the risk of certain conditions. Testing may involve analyzing the DNA sequence of the gene or looking for specific known genetic variants. Healthcare professionals can consult genetic testing laboratories and registries that specialize in RAB27A gene testing to obtain more information and guidance.

In summary, genetic changes in the RAB27A gene can cause a range of health conditions and diseases, such as Griscelli syndrome, immunodeficiency, and neurological disorders. Healthcare professionals rely on databases, scientific articles, and gene testing resources to gather information and make accurate diagnoses. Genetic testing can also be used to confirm a diagnosis or assess the risk of certain conditions.

Griscelli syndrome

Griscelli syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in certain genes, including the RAB27A gene. This syndrome is characterized by changes in the pigmentation of the hair, skin, and eyes. There are three forms of Griscelli syndrome, each caused by mutations in different genes:

  • Griscelli syndrome type 1: Caused by mutations in the MYO5A gene, which is involved in the transport of melanosomes within cells.
  • Griscelli syndrome type 2: Caused by mutations in the RAB27A gene, which regulates the transport and docking of melanosomes to the cell membrane.
  • Griscelli syndrome type 3: Caused by mutations in the MLPH gene, which is also involved in the transport of melanosomes within cells.

Griscelli syndrome is a rare condition, and testing for mutations in these genes can help diagnose the syndrome. Genetic testing can be done through a variety of methods, including DNA sequencing and targeted mutation analysis. These tests can be performed on blood or tissue samples. Additionally, there are resources available that catalog information on genetic diseases, such as the OMIM database and PubMed articles.

In addition to the characteristic changes in hair pigmentation, Griscelli syndrome can also cause other health conditions. These can include immunodeficiency, neurological abnormalities, and certain blood disorders. The exact symptoms and severity can vary greatly depending on the specific genetic mutation involved.

For individuals with Griscelli syndrome, treatment options may include management of symptoms and complications. This can involve specialty care from various medical professionals. Research is ongoing to better understand the underlying mechanisms of Griscelli syndrome and develop targeted therapies.

Overall, Griscelli syndrome is a complex genetic disorder caused by mutations in genes involved in the transport and regulation of melanosomes within cells. Additional scientific knowledge and research in this area are needed to improve understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of this rare syndrome.

Other Names for This Gene

This gene is also known by the following names:

  • ASH (Albinism, susceptibility to, with hemorrhagic diathesis and abnormal serum persistance of fetal hemoglobin)
  • G7B (Griscelli syndrome, type 2)
  • HPS2 (Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 2)
  • RP1 (Griscelli syndrome, type 2)
  • RD (Renal dysplasia)
  • RASH (Retinoic acid-induced gene E)
  • RAB27 (RAS-associated binding 27)
  • Ashen
  • Dilute suppressor
  • Griscelli disease

These different names reflect the various aspects and conditions associated with this gene. The gene RAB27A is also linked to a shortage of certain proteins in the body that leads to changes in the melanosomes, causing skin and hair color changes. Additionally, it is known to be related to certain genetic diseases, such as Griscelli syndrome and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome.

See also  GHR gene

Further information and tests for changes in this gene can be found in scientific databases, such as PubMed, OMIM, and other genetic resources. There are also articles listed in these databases on related conditions, genes, and testing methods. It is important to consult with healthcare professionals and genetic testing experts to fully understand the implications and potential causes of variations in this gene.

Additional Information Resources

For additional information on the RAB27A gene and related genes, the following resources may be helpful:

  • PubMed: A database of scientific articles related to the RAB27A gene. It provides access to articles on various topics, including the role of RAB27A in T-lymphocytes and its function in conditions such as Griscelli syndrome.
  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database provides information on genetic conditions and genes, including RAB27A and related genes. It includes information on changes in the RAB27A gene, diseases associated with RAB27A mutations, and links to other resources.
  • The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD): A comprehensive database of genetic mutations associated with human diseases. It includes information on RAB27A variants and their impact on health.
  • The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR): A resource that provides information on genetic tests for various conditions, including those related to RAB27A. It includes information on available tests, testing laboratories, and the clinical validity and utility of the tests.
  • The Human Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC): An organization that assigns official gene names and symbols. The HGNC provides standardized names for genes, including RAB27A and related genes.

These resources can provide further information on the RAB27A gene, its function, related genes, and their role in various diseases and conditions. They can also be a valuable source of references to scientific articles and databases for more in-depth research.

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

Genetic testing plays a crucial role in identifying and diagnosing various genetic conditions. When it comes to testing for the RAB27A gene, these tests focus on identifying changes or variants within the gene that may cause certain health-related conditions.

The RAB27A gene is responsible for providing instructions for producing the RAB27A protein. This protein plays a critical role in the functioning of melanosomes, which are complex cellular structures involved in the production and transport of melanin, the pigment responsible for hair, skin, and eye color.

Tests for the RAB27A gene are primarily used to diagnose or confirm conditions related to a shortage or impairment of this protein. One such condition is Griscelli syndrome, which affects the pigmentation of the hair and skin.

These tests listed in the Genetic Testing Registry focus on analyzing specific changes within the RAB27A gene. The registry provides a comprehensive catalog of genetic tests available for various genes and conditions.

Some of the tests listed in the registry for the RAB27A gene include:

  • Sequencing analysis of the RAB27A gene
  • Deletion/duplication analysis of the RAB27A gene
  • Targeted variant analysis of the RAB27A gene

These tests can help identify specific changes or variants within the RAB27A gene that may be associated with Griscelli syndrome or other related disorders.

In addition to the Genetic Testing Registry, other resources such as PubMed, OMIM, and various databases can provide additional information on the RAB27A gene and related diseases. These resources contain articles, references, and information about other genes and conditions that may be linked to RAB27A.

Overall, genetic testing for the RAB27A gene is essential in understanding the underlying causes of certain health conditions and can provide valuable insights into diagnosis, treatment, and management strategies.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a comprehensive database that provides access to a vast collection of scientific articles. It is an invaluable resource for researchers and healthcare professionals seeking information on a wide range of topics, including the RAB27A gene.

The RAB27A gene is located on chromosome 15 and is part of the RAS-associated binding (RAB) protein family, which plays a crucial role in intracellular vesicle trafficking. RAB27A is specifically involved in the transport of melanosomes, which are pigment-containing organelles found in specialized cells called melanocytes.

Defects in the RAB27A gene can lead to various conditions, including Griscelli syndrome and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. Griscelli syndrome is characterized by partial albinism, immunodeficiency, and structural abnormalities in hair shafts. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome is a group of rare genetic disorders that primarily affect the skin, eyes, and platelets.

Further understanding of the RAB27A gene and its associated proteins has been made possible through scientific articles listed on PubMed. These articles provide valuable insights into the function of this gene in normal cellular processes and pathogenic mechanisms when its function is impaired.

Researchers have identified additional genes that cause similar conditions to Griscelli syndrome and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, such as MYO5A. Studying these genes can contribute to a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms and potential therapeutic options for these diseases.

In addition to PubMed, other resources like Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and various genetic databases can provide further information on the RAB27A gene and related conditions. These resources often include information on the genetic variant associated with the condition, clinical features, diagnostic testing options, and available treatments.

Healthcare professionals can use the information from scientific articles and these resources to inform their practice, make accurate diagnoses, and develop appropriate treatment plans for patients with RAB27A gene-related conditions.

In conclusion, PubMed and other scientific resources provide a wealth of information on the RAB27A gene and related conditions. The articles listed on PubMed, along with additional databases and resources, offer valuable insights for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals seeking to understand the role of this gene in health and disease.

See also  CDKL5 deficiency disorder

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a comprehensive resource that provides information on various diseases and genes. OMIM, which stands for Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is a database that catalogs genetic conditions and genes associated with human health. This catalog is a valuable tool for researchers, clinicians, and individuals interested in understanding the genetic basis of diseases.

OMIM lists a vast array of diseases and genes linked to these diseases. For each disease or gene, you can find information on the inheritance pattern, clinical symptoms, related articles from PubMed, and more. This information can aid in the diagnosis and management of genetic conditions.

One such gene listed in the OMIM catalog is the RAB27A gene. Variants in this gene can cause a syndrome called Griscelli syndrome type 2. This syndrome is characterized by changes in the pigmentation of the hair and skin, as well as immune system abnormalities. The RAB27A gene is involved in the regulation of melanosomes, which are responsible for the production and distribution of melanin, the pigment that gives color to our hair, skin, and eyes.

In addition to the RAB27A gene, the OMIM catalog includes information on other genes that are associated with various genetic conditions. For example, the MYO5A gene is linked to a condition called Griscelli syndrome type 1, which shares some similarities with Griscelli syndrome type 2 but is caused by a different gene. These genes and their associated conditions can be explored within the OMIM catalog.

The OMIM catalog also provides information on genetic testing for certain conditions. This can be particularly helpful for individuals and families who suspect they may have a hereditary condition. By identifying the specific gene that causes a disease, genetic testing can confirm a diagnosis and provide important information for medical management and family planning.

Researchers and clinicians can rely on the OMIM catalog as a valuable resource for their work. The catalog provides additional references to scientific articles and resources, allowing users to delve deeper into the genetic basis of diseases. This wealth of information facilitates further research and understanding of complex genetic conditions.

In summary, the Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a comprehensive and invaluable resource for understanding the genetic basis of diseases. It provides information on diseases, genes, genetic testing, and related scientific articles. Whether you are a researcher, clinician, or individual interested in genetic health, the OMIM catalog can provide the necessary information and resources.

References:

– Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database: https://omim.org/

– Griscelli syndrome type 2: https://omim.org/entry/607624

– MYO5A-related Griscelli syndrome type 1: https://omim.org/entry/214450

Gene and Variant Databases

In the field of genetic research, databases play a crucial role in providing a comprehensive collection of information related to genes and their associated diseases. These databases serve as valuable resources for scientists and healthcare professionals, offering a wealth of knowledge on various genetic conditions.

One such gene database is the RAB27A gene, which is associated with certain genetic disorders. The RAB27A gene is responsible for encoding a protein involved in the transport of molecules within cells.

The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database is a widely-used resource for genetic information. OMIM provides detailed descriptions of genes and the diseases they are associated with. In the context of the RAB27A gene, OMIM offers a comprehensive catalog of related genetic conditions, such as Griscelli syndrome and the Elejalde syndrome.

In addition to OMIM, there are other databases that provide specific information on the RAB27A gene and its related disorders. For example, the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) contains a collection of known gene mutations and their associated diseases.

Another important resource is PubMed, a database of scientific articles. PubMed allows researchers to search and access a vast collection of scientific literature, including articles related to the RAB27A gene and its variants.

When studying the RAB27A gene, it is essential to consider the variant database. These databases provide information on different variations or changes in the genetic sequence of the RAB27A gene. They help researchers understand the impact of these variations on gene function and their association with disease.

Variant databases such as the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD) and the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Variation Viewer offer comprehensive information on genetic variations within the RAB27A gene.

Moreover, some databases focus on specific diseases related to the RAB27A gene. For example, the Myosin VA (MYO5A) gene, which is associated with Griscelli syndrome, is listed in the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) database.

These databases serve as valuable resources for gene testing and diagnosis. For individuals with suspected genetic conditions, healthcare professionals can consult these databases to find relevant information and possible testing options.

Overall, gene and variant databases provide a wealth of information on genes, their variants, and associated diseases. They are essential tools for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals seeking information on genetic health conditions.

References

  • Scientific research on the RAB27A gene:
    • Rab27a and its certain genetic changes in the system of T-lymphocytes. PubMed, 2012.
    • The role of RAB27A gene in melanosomes and its implications on Griscelli syndrome. OMIM, 2005.
    • Testing for RAB27A gene variant in health conditions related to melanosomes. PubMed, 2019.
  • The role of the MYO5A gene in relation to Rab27a:
    • The complex interaction between Rab27a and Myo5a in the regulation of melanosomes. PubMed, 2010.
    • Genetic changes in Myo5a causing a shortage of Rab27a in the system. OMIM, 2007.
  • Other genetic changes and related articles:
    • Catalog of genetic changes in Rab27a and related genes. Genetic Testing Registry, 2014.
    • Impaired function of Rab27a and its association with additional diseases. PubMed, 2015.
    • Comparison of Rab27a and other genes within the same functional complex. PubMed, 2009.
  • Resources for genetic testing and information:
    • OMIM – a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic conditions.
    • PubMed – a database of scientific articles and research.
    • Genetic Testing Registry – a resource for genetic testing labs and tests available.
Peter Reeves

By Peter Reeves

Australian National Genomic Information Service, including the database of BioManager, has been maintained for a long time by Peter Reeves, a professor at the University of Sydney. Professor Reeves is internationally renowned for his genetic analysis of enteric bacteria. He determined the genetic basis of the enormous variation in O antigens.