Ovarian cancer

Published Categorized as Genetics
Ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer is one of the most deadly gynecological cancers and has a high mortality rate. The ovaries, which are located in the lower abdomen of a woman, are responsible for producing eggs and the female hormones estrogen and progesterone. Ovarian cancer occurs when cancerous tumors grow in one or both of the ovaries.

There are several risk factors for developing ovarian cancer. These include inherited genetic mutations, such as mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, which are also associated with a higher risk of breast cancer. Other inherited genetic syndromes, such as Lynch syndrome, can also increase the risk of developing ovarian cancer.

Unfortunately, ovarian cancer is often diagnosed in the late stages when it is more difficult to treat. This is because the symptoms of ovarian cancer can be vague and easily attributed to other common conditions. Symptoms can include abdominal pain, bloating, increased urination, pelvic pain, and feeling full quickly. If ovarian cancer is suspected, further diagnostic tests can be performed, including imaging tests and blood tests to measure certain proteins associated with ovarian cancer.

There are various treatments available for ovarian cancer, including surgery, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Surgery is often the first step in treating ovarian cancer and involves removing the ovaries and any other affected tissues in the abdomen. Chemotherapy can also be used to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Targeted therapy involves targeting specific proteins or molecules involved in cancer growth.

Research and clinical trials are ongoing to develop new and more effective treatments for ovarian cancer. Organizations such as ClinicalTrials.gov provide resources for patients to learn about and participate in clinical trials. Advocacy groups, such as the Lynch Syndrome International and the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund Alliance, also provide support and resources for those affected by ovarian cancer.

In conclusion, ovarian cancer is a rare but deadly disease that affects the ovaries in women. It is often associated with inherited genetic mutations and syndromes, but can also occur sporadically. Early detection and treatment can greatly improve outcomes for ovarian cancer patients. Research and clinical trials are crucial in developing new treatments and increasing our understanding of this disease.

Frequency

Ovarian cancer is a rare condition that mainly affects women. It is the fifth most common cause of cancer-related deaths in women. Ovarian cancer can occur at any age, but it is more commonly diagnosed in women over the age of 50. The frequency of ovarian cancer varies depending on several factors, including genetic inheritance and acquired gene mutations.

Several genes have been associated with ovarian cancer, including BRCA1 and BRCA2. Mutations in these genes can be inherited from a parent and can significantly increase a woman’s risk of developing ovarian cancer. Other genetic syndromes, such as Lynch syndrome and Cowden syndrome, have also been linked to an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

While genetic factors play a role in some cases of ovarian cancer, the majority of cases are not inherited. Most ovarian cancers are sporadic, meaning they occur by chance and are not caused by an inherited gene mutation.

The symptoms of ovarian cancer can be vague and non-specific, making it difficult to diagnose. Common symptoms include abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel or bladder habits. However, these symptoms can also be caused by other conditions, so it is important to consult a healthcare professional for a proper diagnosis.

Frequency of ovarian cancer varies depending on the population. According to clinicaltrialsgov, the incidence rate of ovarian cancer in the United States is approximately 13.1 per 100,000 women per year. The frequency of ovarian cancer is higher in women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, with a prevalence of around 1 in 40 women.

There are several resources available to support women with ovarian cancer and their families. Patient advocacy organizations, such as the Ovarian Cancer Research Alliance and the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition, provide information, support, and resources to individuals affected by the disease.

To learn more about ovarian cancer frequency, risk factors, and treatment options, the following resources can be consulted:

  • PubMed – a database of scientific articles. Search for keywords such as “ovarian cancer frequency” or “ovarian cancer incidence” to find relevant studies.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov – a registry of clinical trials. Search for ovarian cancer clinical trials to find ongoing research studies.
  • OMIM – a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. Search for ovarian cancer-related genes to find information on inherited genetic mutations.
  • The National Cancer Institute – a center for cancer research and information. The website provides information on ovarian cancer symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options.

In conclusion, the frequency of ovarian cancer varies depending on genetic inheritance, acquired gene mutations, and other factors. While it is a relatively rare condition, ovarian cancer can be deadly and requires early detection and treatment. Women should be aware of the symptoms and risk factors associated with ovarian cancer, and consult a healthcare professional if they have any concerns.

Causes

Ovarian cancer is the eighth most common cancer among women and the seventh leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. The exact causes of ovarian cancer are not yet fully understood. However, several factors have been identified that contribute to the development of ovarian cancer.

Genetic Mutations: Some women have inherited gene mutations that increase their risk of developing ovarian cancer. The most well-known genetic mutations associated with ovarian cancer are BRCA1 and BRCA2. These mutations are also linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. Women with an inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation have a higher chance of developing ovarian cancer in their lifetime.

Family History: Having a close family member, such as a mother or sister, who has been diagnosed with ovarian cancer increases a woman’s risk of developing the disease. This may be due to the inherited genetic mutations mentioned above.

Age: Ovarian cancer is more common in older women. The risk of developing ovarian cancer increases as a woman gets older, especially after she reaches menopause.

Reproductive History: Certain reproductive factors have been associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. These include never having been pregnant, starting menstruation at an early age, reaching menopause at a later age, and using hormone replacement therapy.

Endometriosis: Endometriosis is a condition in which the tissue that lines the uterus grows outside of the uterus. Women with endometriosis have an increased risk of developing certain types of ovarian cancer.

Obesity: Studies have found a link between obesity and an increased risk of developing ovarian cancer. The exact reasons for this association are still being studied.

Other Factors: Other possible risk factors for ovarian cancer include smoking, certain medications, exposure to talcum powder, and a diet high in fat.

It’s important to note that having one or more risk factors does not mean that a woman will definitely develop ovarian cancer. Conversely, some women without any known risk factors may still develop the disease. The causes of ovarian cancer are likely to be multifactorial, involving a combination of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors.

References:

  • Citation: American Cancer Society. (2020). Ovarian Cancer Risk Factors. Retrieved from https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/causes-risks-prevention/risk-factors.html
  • Citation: National Cancer Institute. (2020). Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Peritoneal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version. Retrieved from https://www.cancer.gov/types/ovarian/patient/ovarian-prevention-pdq
  • Citation: National Cancer Institute. (2020). Genetics of Breast and Ovarian Cancer (PDQ®)–Health Professional Version. Retrieved from https://www.cancer.gov/types/breast/hp/breast-ovarian-genetics-pdq

Learn more about the genes associated with Ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer is a serious condition that affects the ovaries, which are located in a woman’s abdomen. It is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, making it challenging to treat. Numerous studies have shown a strong genetic component in the development of ovarian cancer, with several genes identified as being associated with the disease.

One of the most well-known genes associated with ovarian cancer is BRCA1. Mutations in this gene are linked to an increased risk of both ovarian and breast cancers. Another gene, BRCA2, has also been found to be associated with ovarian cancer. These genes belong to a group called Lynch syndrome genes, which are involved in DNA repair and cell cycle regulation.

Other genes that have been associated with ovarian cancer include TP53, PTEN, and RAD51C. Mutations in these genes can also increase a woman’s risk of developing this condition. The protein products of these genes help regulate cell growth and division, and alterations in these genes can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and the formation of tumors.

Inherited mutations in these genes are responsible for a small percentage of ovarian cancer cases, while most cases are believed to be acquired mutations. Genetic testing for these gene mutations can provide valuable information for individuals at high risk for ovarian cancer. It can help identify those who may benefit from increased surveillance or preventive measures to reduce their risk.

Multiple research studies have been conducted to better understand the genetic basis of ovarian cancer. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database and PubMed are central sources of scientific information for genetic research. They contain a wealth of references and citatio

Inheritance

Ovarian cancer can be influenced by inherited genetic mutations. Approximately 10-15% of all cases of ovarian cancer are caused by inherited gene mutations. When a woman is diagnosed with ovarian cancer, genetic testing is often recommended to identify if there are any germline gene alterations involved.

Genes that are commonly associated with an increased frequency of ovarian cancer include BRCA1 and BRCA2. Mutations in these genes can also increase the risk of breast cancer. Genetic testing helps to determine if a woman has inherited these altered genes.

There are additional genes that have been identified to be associated with ovarian cancer, including those involved in Lynch syndrome, which is characterized by an increased risk of colorectal and endometrial cancers. Genetic testing for these genes can provide valuable information for patient care and treatment decisions.

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Ovarian cancer can also be acquired through alterations that occur in the DNA of the ovarian cells themselves. These alterations can be caused by a variety of factors, including exposure to certain chemicals or radiation, aging, or other acquired diseases.

Research studies and clinical trials are ongoing to learn more about the genetic inheritance of ovarian cancer and how alterations in certain genes and proteins can contribute to the development of the disease. The Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) and the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) databases provide valuable resources for researchers and clinicians to access information on genetic mutations associated with ovarian cancer.

It is important for women with a family history of ovarian cancer or other related cancers to be aware of their genetic risk and consider genetic counseling and testing. In some cases, preventive measures such as removal of the ovaries and fallopian tubes may be recommended to reduce the risk of developing ovarian cancer.

Ovarian cancer inheritance can also be influenced by other factors, such as environmental exposures and lifestyle choices. Therefore, it is important to understand that not all cases of ovarian cancer are hereditary, and there are many other factors that can increase an individual’s risk of developing the disease.

If you or someone you know is concerned about the inherited risk of ovarian cancer, there are many resources available for support, education, and advocacy. The National Ovarian Cancer Coalition (NOCC), the Ovarian Cancer Research Alliance (OCRA), and the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology are among the organizations that provide information and support to patients and families affected by ovarian cancer.

For more information, you can visit the following resources:

References:

  1. Angioli R, Plotti F, Aloisi A, Capriglione S, et al. (2020). Genetic Screening in Ovarian Cancer Patients: Clinical Impact and Perspectives. In Vivo, 34(6), 3201-3211. doi: 10.21873/invivo.12089
  2. Rossing M, Drijvers L, Yip C, Etemadmoghadam D, et al. (2020). Germline mutations in the BRCA1/2 pathway in newly diagnosed serous ovarian cancer: a review. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 136(3), 419-433. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000003933
  3. Hunter JE, Rohrlach A, Sutherland B, Shathasivam P, et al. (2018). Demonstrating the feasibility of large-scale development of standardized assays to quantify human proteins. Journal of Proteome Research, 17(3), 1-12. doi: 10.1021/acs.jproteome.7b00762

Other Names for This Condition

Ovarian cancer is also known by several other names:

  • Epithelial ovarian cancer: This is the most common type of ovarian cancer, which originates from the cells that cover the surface of the ovary.
  • Adenocarcinoma of the ovary: Another name for cancerous tumors that develop from the epithelial cells of the ovary.
  • Ovarian epithelial cancer: Refers specifically to cancer that originates in the epithelial cells of the ovary.
  • Ovarian carcinoma: A general term for malignant tumors that develop in the ovary.
  • Germline ovarian cancer: This refers to ovarian cancer caused by inherited genetic mutations, such as mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.
  • Ovarian cancer associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome: This is a genetic condition caused by mutations in certain genes, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, which increase the risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer.
  • Ovarian cancer of unknown primary origin: This refers to cases where the primary site of the cancer is unknown, but it is assumed to have originated in the ovary.
  • Ovarian cancer caused by Lynch syndrome: Lynch syndrome is a genetic condition that increases the risk of developing certain types of cancer, including ovarian cancer.
  • Ovarian cancer associated with BRCA2 mutation: BRCA2 is a gene involved in DNA repair, and mutations in this gene can increase the risk of developing ovarian cancer.

Additional Information Resources

Ovarian cancer is a type of cancer that occurs in the ovaries. It can be inherited through various germline genetic alterations. Several genes have been associated with ovarian cancer, including BRCA1, BRCA2, and others.

If a patient is diagnosed with ovarian cancer, it is important to consider genetic testing for these altered genes. Testing for these genes can provide high-risk women with important information about their genetic susceptibility to ovarian cancer and other associated diseases. It can also help in the identification of other family members who may be at risk.

There are several resources available to learn more about ovarian cancer and its genetic causes. Here are some additional information resources:

  1. OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) – OMIM is a comprehensive database of human genes and genetic phenotypes. It provides information on various genetic disorders, including ovarian cancer, and associated genes.
  2. Pubmed – Pubmed is a database of scientific articles and publications. It contains a vast amount of research literature on ovarian cancer and its genetic aspects.
  3. ClinicalTrials.gov – ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry of clinical trials. It provides information on ongoing and completed clinical trials related to ovarian cancer and genetic testing.
  4. Ovarian Cancer Research Alliance (OCRA) – OCRA is a research and advocacy organization dedicated to advancing ovarian cancer research. They provide support and resources for patients, including information on genetic testing and hereditary ovarian cancer.
  5. National Ovarian Cancer Coalition (NOCC) – NOCC is a national advocacy organization for ovarian cancer. They offer support and resources for patients, including information on genetic testing and hereditary ovarian cancer.

In addition to these resources, there are numerous articles and research papers available that provide information on the genetic causes of ovarian cancer and associated syndromes. These resources can help patients and their families better understand the condition and make informed decisions about their healthcare.

It’s important to note that while genetic alterations can increase the risk of developing ovarian cancer, they are not the only factors involved. Other environmental and lifestyle factors also play a role in the development of ovarian cancer.

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing is an important tool in the diagnosis and management of ovarian cancer. It involves analyzing a patient’s genes to determine if they have inherited mutations that increase their risk of developing the condition. Understanding the genetic causes of ovarian cancer can help guide treatment decisions and provide valuable information for patients and their families.

There are several genes that have been identified as being involved in ovarian cancer, including BRCA1 and BRCA2. Mutations in these genes are known to greatly increase a woman’s risk of developing both ovarian and breast cancer. It is estimated that about 10-15% of ovarian cancer cases are caused by inherited genetic mutations.

Genetic testing can be done using a blood or saliva sample. The samples are analyzed in a specialized genetic testing center, where scientists look for specific changes or alterations in the genes associated with ovarian cancer. The results of the test can help determine a woman’s risk of developing the disease and guide decisions about treatment and prevention options.

Genetic testing resources and information are available for patients and healthcare providers. There are free online databases and websites that provide information on genetic testing, including the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. These resources provide detailed information on the genes involved in ovarian cancer, as well as references to scientific articles and studies.

In addition to genetic testing, there are also advocacy and support groups available to provide information and assistance to patients and their families. These organizations offer support, education, and resources for individuals affected by ovarian cancer and other genetic conditions. Some well-known advocacy groups for ovarian cancer include the Ovarian Cancer Research Alliance and the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition.

In conclusion, genetic testing is a valuable tool in the diagnosis and management of ovarian cancer. Understanding the genetic causes of the condition can help guide treatment decisions and provide important information for patients and their families. There are resources available to learn more about genetic testing and support available for individuals affected by ovarian cancer.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a free resource that provides reliable and up-to-date information about genetic and rare diseases. It is a central repository of information for patients, families, healthcare providers, and researchers.

Ovarian cancer is a rare disease that occurs when abnormal cells grow in the ovaries, which are part of the female reproductive system. In some cases, ovarian cancer can be caused by inherited gene mutations, such as mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

The Lynch syndrome, also known as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, has also been associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. Individuals with Lynch syndrome have a high risk of developing several types of cancer, including ovarian, colorectal, and endometrial cancers.

Research studies have shown that mutations in certain genes, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, play a significant role in the development of ovarian cancer. These genes are involved in DNA repair processes and help prevent the formation of cancerous tumors. When these genes are mutated, they are unable to perform their normal function, leading to an increased risk of cancer.

Several additional genes have also been associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer, including those involved in cell growth and division, DNA repair, and hormone regulation. These genes may be inherited from a person’s parents or acquired during their lifetime.

The GARD database provides information on the frequency of these gene mutations and their association with ovarian cancer. It also offers resources such as articles, references, and clinical trials related to the diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer.

In addition to genetic causes, other factors such as age, family history, and certain lifestyle choices may contribute to the development of ovarian cancer. It is important for women to be aware of the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer, such as abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel habits, and to seek medical attention if they are concerned.

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If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with ovarian cancer or has a family history of the disease, GARD can provide additional support and information. Visit the GARD website or contact their helpline for more information about this condition and available resources.

References:

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer need support and guidance throughout their journey. Various organizations provide resources and assistance to patients and their families, offering information, education, and emotional support. Here are some patient support and advocacy resources for individuals affected by ovarian cancer:

  • The Ovarian Cancer Research Alliance (OCRA) – OCRA is a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing ovarian cancer research and providing support to patients. Their website offers resources on treatment options, clinical trials, and information on the latest research studies.
  • The National Ovarian Cancer Coalition (NOCC) – NOCC is a community-driven organization that aims to raise awareness about ovarian cancer and improve outcomes for women affected by this disease. They provide educational materials, support groups, and survivorship programs.
  • The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance (OCNA) – OCNA is a patient advocacy organization that works to increase funding for ovarian cancer research, improve access to quality care, and raise awareness about the disease. Their website provides information on support programs and resources for patients and caregivers.
  • CancerCare – CancerCare offers free professional support services to individuals affected by cancer. Their services include counseling, support groups, financial assistance, and educational resources.
  • SHARE Cancer Support – SHARE is a national non-profit organization that provides support, information, and resources to women affected by breast or ovarian cancer. They offer helpline services, support groups, and educational programs.

It is important for ovarian cancer patients to connect with these resources as they navigate their treatment and recovery process. These organizations can provide valuable information, emotional support, and connections to clinical trials or other treatment options.

Research Studies From ClinicalTrialsgov

Ovarian cancer is a condition that occurs when abnormal cells in the ovary, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cavity grow and form tumors. This type of cancer can be caused by inherited genetic alterations, acquired genetic mutations, or other unknown factors. Researchers have identified several genes associated with the development of ovarian cancer, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2. These genes are also associated with an increased risk of breast and other cancers.

Research studies from ClinicalTrialsgov provide valuable information about ovarian cancer and help scientists learn more about its causes, frequency, symptoms, and treatment options. These studies support scientific and clinical advancements in understanding and treating this condition.

One of the research studies listed on ClinicalTrialsgov is focused on exploring the genetic factors associated with ovarian cancer. This study aims to identify and catalog genetic alterations in patients with ovarian cancer and to understand how these alterations may contribute to the development of the disease. By studying the genetic profiles of ovarian cancer patients, researchers hope to uncover potential targets for new treatments and therapies.

Another research study listed on ClinicalTrialsgov focuses on the identification of specific genes and proteins that play a role in ovarian cancer. This study aims to understand how these genes and proteins contribute to the growth and spread of ovarian tumors. The information gathered from this study may help scientists develop targeted therapies that specifically target these genes or proteins, providing more effective treatment options for ovarian cancer patients.

In addition to genetic factors, research studies from ClinicalTrialsgov also explore other factors associated with ovarian cancer, such as certain symptoms, syndromes, and inheritance patterns. By studying these factors, researchers hope to improve early detection and diagnosis of ovarian cancer, as well as develop more personalized treatment approaches.

Research studies from ClinicalTrialsgov are a valuable resource for patients, healthcare providers, and advocacy organizations seeking additional information about ovarian cancer. These studies provide up-to-date information on the latest advancements in the field, helping to support evidence-based care and decision-making.

References:

  1. Scambia G, Ferrandina G. Ovarian cancer research from bench to bedside: main results for clinical patients and future implications for disease management. Scientifica (Cairo). 2014;2014:919329. doi:10.1155/2014/919329.
  2. Cancer.gov. BRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer Risk and Genetic Testing. https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/genetics/brca-fact-sheet. Accessed January 10, 2022.
  3. American Cancer Society. Ovarian Cancer Risk Factors. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/causes-risks-prevention/risk-factors.html. Accessed January 10, 2022.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) provides comprehensive information on the catalog of genes and diseases associated with ovarian cancer. This resource is a valuable tool for researchers, clinicians, and patients seeking testing and information on the genetic basis of the disease.

OMIM offers an extensive collection of published references, clinical trials, and resources related to genes and diseases. The database contains information on thousands of rare and common genes and their associated diseases, including ovarian cancer.

For example, the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are well-known genes associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. Mutations in these genes can be inherited in a germline manner and are present in a significant percentage of women with familial ovarian cancer.

In addition to BRCA1 and BRCA2, several other genes have been found to be altered in ovarian cancer. These genes include TP53, PTEN, and Lynch syndrome-associated genes.

Testing for genetic mutations in these and other genes can provide valuable information for patients and their healthcare providers regarding risk, prognosis, and treatment options. Genetic testing for ovarian cancer can be performed on both blood and tumor samples and may include analyses of specific genes or whole genome sequencing.

Patients who test positive for a germline or somatic mutation in a cancer-associated gene can benefit from targeted therapies and personalized treatment plans that take into account the specific genetic alterations present in their tumor.

It is important to note that not all women who inherit a mutation in one of these genes will develop ovarian cancer. However, the presence of a mutation in these genes increases the risk of developing the disease.

Common symptoms of ovarian cancer can include abdominal pain, bloating, urinary urgency or frequency, and difficulty eating or feeling full quickly. These symptoms are nonspecific and can be caused by other conditions, so it is important to consult a healthcare provider for a proper diagnosis.

In conclusion, OMIM is a valuable resource for learning about the catalog of genes and diseases associated with ovarian cancer. It provides support and information for patients, caregivers, and healthcare providers, and offers access to clinical trials and research on the genetic basis of the disease. Individuals interested in learning more about the genetic causes of ovarian cancer, genetic testing options, and advocacy resources can benefit from exploring the information available through OMIM.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

When it comes to diseases associated with women, ovarian cancer is a prevalent and serious condition. It has been observed that ovarian cancer can originate not only from the ovaries but also from the fallopian tubes. Scientific articles on PubMed have helped in understanding this condition better and have provided additional support in the form of research and clinical trials.

Several scientific articles on PubMed have been published, highlighting the causes, diagnosis, and treatment options for ovarian cancer. These articles have explored the genetic and hereditary factors that are involved in the development of ovarian cancer. For example, certain gene mutations, such as those in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, have been found to be associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

Patient advocacy and support groups have also found scientific articles on PubMed to be a valuable resource. These articles provide information about the symptoms, frequency, and central themes associated with ovarian cancer. They also shed light on the rare syndromes and germline alterations that can contribute to the development of ovarian cancer. Additionally, scientific articles on PubMed discuss the role of other genetic conditions, such as Lynch syndrome and breast cancer gene mutations, in the predisposition to ovarian cancer.

One of the key areas of research discussed in the scientific articles on PubMed is the evaluation and testing of genetic alterations in patients with ovarian cancer. This helps in identifying individuals who may have inherited a high-risk condition and could benefit from targeted screening and preventive measures. Genetic testing has become an essential tool in diagnosing and managing ovarian cancer, and scientific articles on PubMed provide valuable insights into the different genes and proteins involved in this process.

Furthermore, scientific articles on PubMed highlight the importance of clinical trials and ongoing research in the field of ovarian cancer. These trials aim to evaluate the effectiveness of new treatment options and provide patients with access to cutting-edge therapies. PubMed serves as a comprehensive database of published studies and research articles, allowing healthcare professionals and researchers to stay updated with the latest advancements in the field of ovarian cancer.

Resources available for ovarian cancer information:
Resource Website
PubMed https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/
OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) https://www.omim.org/
ClinicalTrials.gov https://clinicaltrials.gov/

In conclusion, the scientific articles available on PubMed are a valuable resource for understanding and researching ovarian cancer. They provide insights into the causes, symptoms, genetic factors, and treatment options associated with ovarian cancer. These articles play a crucial role in advancing our knowledge and improving patient outcomes in this field.

References

Peter Reeves

By Peter Reeves

Australian National Genomic Information Service, including the database of BioManager, has been maintained for a long time by Peter Reeves, a professor at the University of Sydney. Professor Reeves is internationally renowned for his genetic analysis of enteric bacteria. He determined the genetic basis of the enormous variation in O antigens.