Orthostatic hypotension

Published Categorized as Genetics
Orthostatic hypotension

Orthostatic hypotension, also known as postural hypotension, is a medical condition characterized by a decrease in blood pressure when a person stands up. This condition can result in symptoms such as dizziness, lightheadedness, and fainting. It is often caused by an inadequate response by the body’s autonomic nervous system to changes in position. Orthostatic hypotension can be a transient issue that is easily resolved, or it can be chronic and require medical intervention.

There are several causes of orthostatic hypotension, including medication side effects, dehydration, certain medical conditions, and neurological disorders. It can also be inherited genetically, with some families experiencing a higher incidence of the condition. Research and clinical trials are ongoing to better understand the causes and effective treatments for orthostatic hypotension.

Orthostatic hypotension is often defined as a decrease in systolic blood pressure of at least 20 mmHg or a decrease in diastolic blood pressure of at least 10 mmHg within three minutes of standing up. This condition can occur in otherwise healthy individuals, but it is more common in older adults and those with certain medical conditions.

Treatment for orthostatic hypotension often involves addressing the underlying cause of the condition. Lifestyle changes, such as increasing fluid intake and avoiding sudden movements, can also be helpful in managing symptoms. In some cases, medication may be prescribed to regulate blood pressure and improve symptoms. It is important for patients with orthostatic hypotension to work with their healthcare provider to develop an individualized treatment plan.

In addition to medical treatment, there are resources available for patients and their families to learn more about orthostatic hypotension. Advocacy groups, such as the National Institutes of Health and the American Autonomic Society, provide information and support for individuals and families affected by this condition. Scientific articles and studies can be found on PubMed and other scientific references provide further information about the causes, symptoms, and management of orthostatic hypotension.

Frequency

Orthostatic hypotension is a relatively rare condition. According to Stewart et al., the condition was defined as transient blood pressure (BP) changes within 3 minutes of standing, which often resulted in symptoms such as dizziness and fainting.

Studies have shown that orthostatic hypotension affects between 5-30% of the population, depending on the specific population and diagnostic criteria used. This wide range of prevalence can be attributed to differences in study designs, patient populations, and the diagnostic criteria used to define the condition.

Orthostatic hypotension can occur in individuals of all ages, but it is most commonly seen in the elderly. Within the elderly population, the frequency of orthostatic hypotension increases with age. It has been found that up to 30% of individuals over the age of 65 may experience orthostatic hypotension.

Orthostatic hypotension can be caused by a variety of underlying conditions, such as neurological disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and certain medications. It can also be a result of autonomic dysfunction or be inherited as a genetic condition.

Additional research and genetic studies are needed to better understand the frequency and inheritance of orthostatic hypotension. The rare nature of the condition and the lack of large-scale clinical trials make it difficult to establish a clear understanding of the genetics and inheritance patterns associated with orthostatic hypotension.

References to clinical trials and scientific articles on orthostatic hypotension can be found on resources such as PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov. However, the number of studies focusing on orthostatic hypotension is limited, emphasizing the need for further research and resources in this area.

Causes

Orthostatic hypotension can be caused by a variety of factors. Some of the common causes include:

  • Dehydration: When the body does not have enough fluids, it can lead to a drop in blood pressure.
  • Medications: Certain medications, such as those used to treat high blood pressure or heart conditions, can cause orthostatic hypotension as a side effect.
  • Anemia: Low levels of red blood cells can impair the body’s ability to transport oxygen, leading to a drop in blood pressure.
  • Age: Orthostatic hypotension is more common in older adults, as the body’s ability to regulate blood pressure may decline with age.
  • Neurological disorders: Certain neurological conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease or multiple system atrophy, can disrupt the body’s autonomic nervous system, which controls blood pressure.
  • Genetic factors: In some cases, orthostatic hypotension may be genetic and inherited within families.

While these are some of the common causes of orthostatic hypotension, there may be additional and, often, rare causes as well. Further research is needed to fully understand these causes and their frequency.

For more information on specific causes and research studies, resources such as PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov, and scientific articles can provide valuable information and support for patients with this condition.

Inheritance

The genetic causes of orthostatic hypotension are relatively rare, with only a small percentage of cases being inherited. In most cases, orthostatic hypotension is a sporadic condition, meaning it occurs without any known family history.

However, there are some rare genetic conditions that are defined by orthostatic hypotension as one of their symptoms. One example is familial dysautonomia, which is caused by a mutation in the IKBKAP gene. This condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, meaning that both parents must carry a copy of the mutated gene for their child to be affected.

Additional research is needed to better understand the genetic factors that contribute to orthostatic hypotension. ClinicalTrials.gov provides information on ongoing studies and clinical trials related to orthostatic hypotension and genetic inheritance.

Genetic Inheritance

Orthostatic hypotension can often be traced back to genetic inheritance. However, the frequency and specific genes involved in this condition are still being researched.

Orthostatic hypotension can be inherited in an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked pattern. Autosomal dominant inheritance means that an affected individual has a 50% chance of passing on the condition to their children. Autosomal recessive inheritance requires both parents to be carriers of the condition in order to have an affected child. X-linked inheritance means that the condition can be passed down through the X chromosome, with males being more commonly affected than females.

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Genetic Studies and Research

Several studies and research articles have been published on the genetics of orthostatic hypotension. These studies aim to identify the specific genes involved in the condition and understand their role in the body’s blood pressure regulation.

Scientific articles on orthostatic hypotension and its genetic basis can be found on PubMed, a database of biomedical literature. These articles provide valuable information for researchers, healthcare professionals, and individuals affected by orthostatic hypotension.

Patient Resources and Advocacy

For individuals affected by orthostatic hypotension, there are resources and support available. Patient advocacy organizations, such as Dysautonomia International and The Autonomic Disorders Consortium, provide information, support, and resources for individuals and families affected by orthostatic hypotension and related autonomic disorders.

These organizations often collaborate with research centers and participate in clinical trials to further the understanding and treatment of orthostatic hypotension and other autonomic disorders.

Other Names for This Condition

Orthostatic hypotension is also known by several other names, including:

  • Transient orthostatic hypotension
  • Postural hypotension
  • Orthostatic intolerance
  • Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS)

These names are often used interchangeably, but they may have slightly different meanings or refer to specific subtypes or related conditions. On scientific articles and research studies, you may see references to these other names for orthostatic hypotension.

While orthostatic hypotension is the most commonly used term, transient orthostatic hypotension emphasizes the temporary nature of the condition. Postural hypotension refers to the drop in blood pressure that occurs when a person changes body position (from lying down to standing up). Orthostatic intolerance is a broader term that encompasses various conditions characterized by impaired blood pressure regulation in response to postural changes.

Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a specific form of orthostatic intolerance in which patients experience symptoms such as rapid heartbeat, lightheadedness, and fainting upon standing. POTS is often diagnosed based on clinical findings, such as an increase in heart rate of at least 30 beats per minute within 10 minutes of standing up, along with symptoms of orthostatic intolerance.

It’s important to note that orthostatic hypotension can have various causes, including genetic factors, certain medications, and underlying medical conditions. Within the medical community, there may be additional names or classification systems used to further define or classify specific subtypes of orthostatic hypotension.

For further information about orthostatic hypotension and related conditions, the following resources may be of help:

  • The National Institutes of Health (NIH) provides information on orthostatic hypotension on its official website.
  • PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research studies where you can find more information about orthostatic hypotension and related topics.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov is a website that lists ongoing clinical trials related to orthostatic hypotension. These studies may help support further research and understanding of the condition.
  • The Dysautonomia International advocacy organization focuses on raising awareness and providing support for individuals with various autonomic disorders, including orthostatic hypotension.
  • The Mayo Clinic – a leading medical center – has resources on orthostatic hypotension and related diseases, which may provide additional information and support.

Additional Information Resources

  • Scientific studies have often advocated for further research into orthostatic hypotension and its causes. These studies have identified genetic factors that can impair the body’s ability to regulate blood pressure and have provided references to clinical trials and other resources.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov is a valuable resource for finding ongoing clinical trials related to orthostatic hypotension. Many of these trials focus on genetic causes and potential treatments for the condition.
  • Patient advocacy organizations and other support groups can provide additional information and resources for individuals with orthostatic hypotension. These organizations often provide articles, patient forums, and other support services.
  • Orthostatic hypotension is a relatively rare condition, and its frequency varies depending on the population studied. While it is not a common problem, it can significantly impact an individual’s quality of life.
  • Orthostatic hypotension is also known as postural hypotension, neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, and orthostatic intolerance. These names are often used interchangeably to describe the condition.
  • Publications on orthostatic hypotension can be found in scientific journals such as PubMed. These articles provide valuable information on the latest research findings and treatment options.
  • The Stewart Center for Research on Orthostatic Hypotension is a leading institution dedicated to studying orthostatic hypotension. They conduct various research projects to better understand the condition, its causes, and potential treatment options.
  • Inheritance patterns for orthostatic hypotension can be complex, with both environmental and genetic factors playing a role. Genetic testing and counseling can provide more information about the specific genetic mutations or variations that may contribute to a person’s risk of developing the condition.
  • Transient orthostatic hypotension is a defined medical condition characterized by a temporary drop in blood pressure upon standing. It is different from chronic orthostatic hypotension, which is a long-term and ongoing problem.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a valuable resource for individuals seeking articles, information, and support related to genetic and rare diseases. GARD provides access to a wide range of resources, including patient support groups, scientific studies, and clinical trials.

GARD offers a comprehensive database of genetic and rare diseases, providing information on the causes, inheritance patterns, and clinical features of these conditions. The database also includes references to scientific articles and studies from PubMed, a trusted source for medical literature.

One such genetic condition that GARD provides information on is orthostatic hypotension. Orthostatic hypotension is defined as a transient drop in blood pressure upon standing up. It can cause symptoms such as dizziness, lightheadedness, and fainting.

GARD also lists other genetic and rare diseases that can cause similar problems, some of which may be inherited or have a genetic component. These include conditions such as dysautonomia and Shy-Drager syndrome.

However, not all cases of orthostatic hypotension are genetic in nature. Some cases can occur without a clear genetic cause. GARD provides information on both genetic and non-genetic causes of orthostatic hypotension.

In addition to providing information on specific genetic conditions, GARD also offers resources for individuals seeking support and advocacy within the rare disease community. This includes a list of patient support groups and organizations that provide additional information and support.

GARD is a valuable resource for individuals and families affected by genetic and rare diseases. Its database of information, articles, and patient support groups can help individuals navigate the complexities of these conditions and find the support they need.

See also  Glutaric acidemia type I

References:

  • GARD: Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center
  • PubMed
  • Stewart JM, et al. Orthostatic intolerance: an overview. In: UpToDate, Post TW (Ed), UpToDate, Waltham, MA. (Accessed on October 20, 2021.)

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients and families affected by orthostatic hypotension can benefit from various support and advocacy resources. These resources provide information, assistance, and a sense of community for individuals living with this condition. Some of the resources available include:

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

  • GARD provides reliable information on genetic and rare diseases, including orthostatic hypotension. They offer resources to help patients and families understand the genetic causes and inheritance patterns of this condition.

ClinicalTrials.gov

  • Patients interested in participating in research studies or clinical trials can find information on ongoing studies related to orthostatic hypotension on ClinicalTrials.gov. These studies explore potential treatments and management strategies for the condition.

Additional Resources

  • The Stewart Center for Research on Orthostatic Disorders is a scientific center dedicated to studying orthostatic hypotension and other related conditions. They provide valuable information and resources for patients and healthcare professionals.
  • PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research papers. It can be a useful resource for patients and families looking for more in-depth information on orthostatic hypotension and its management.

In addition to these resources, patient support and advocacy groups can also provide valuable support and information. These groups often have online forums, educational materials, and community events that can help patients connect with others facing similar challenges. It is important for patients and families to seek out these resources to better understand their condition and find the support they need.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrialsgov

ClinicalTrials.gov is a comprehensive database of research studies conducted all over the world. It provides valuable information on various medical conditions, including orthostatic hypotension.

Research studies listed on ClinicalTrials.gov often have names that reflect the condition being studied. For example, a study called “Genetic Causes of Orthostatic Hypotension” aims to understand the genetic basis of this condition.

The data collected in these studies are often used to define the frequency of orthostatic hypotension within the population. Researchers analyze the results to identify additional risk factors or genetic markers that may contribute to the development of the condition.

These studies also investigate the transient drop in blood pressure that occurs when a patient stands up, known as orthostatic hypotension. They explore the underlying causes and mechanisms of this phenomenon to provide better patient care and management.

Orthostatic hypotension is often associated with other cardiovascular problems. Research studies aim to uncover the relationship between orthostatic hypotension and diseases such as rare genetic cardiol diseases. The results of these studies can have a significant impact on the diagnosis and treatment of rare genetic diseases.

One example of a study listed on ClinicalTrials.gov is “Orthostatic Hypotension and Falls in Parkinson’s Disease.” This study focuses on understanding the frequency and impact of orthostatic hypotension in Parkinson’s disease patients, who are particularly prone to falling.

Patients and healthcare professionals can find valuable information on orthostatic hypotension research studies through ClinicalTrials.gov. The database offers resources and references to published articles and scientific research on the topic.

Advocacy and support groups can also benefit from the information available on ClinicalTrials.gov. They can use the data from research studies to advocate for better care and management of orthostatic hypotension within the medical community.

In conclusion, ClinicalTrials.gov provides a wealth of information on research studies related to orthostatic hypotension. These studies help define the condition’s frequency, explore its causes, and offer insights into its relationship with other diseases. Patients, healthcare professionals, and advocacy groups can all benefit from the resources available on ClinicalTrials.gov.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Introduction

Orthostatic hypotension is a condition characterized by a decrease in blood pressure when a person stands up from a sitting or lying position. It can be a symptom of certain diseases or can occur as a rare and transient condition.

Scientific Studies on Orthostatic Hypotension

Scientific articles on PubMed provide valuable information on the diagnosis, causes, frequency, and treatment of orthostatic hypotension. These studies often define the condition and discuss its impact on patient health.

  • Genetic and Inherited Causes: Some articles explore the genetic factors that may contribute to orthostatic hypotension, identifying potential genes that may be implicated in the condition.
  • Impaired Autonomic Nervous System: Studies discuss how autonomic dysfunction can lead to orthostatic hypotension and the associated symptoms.
  • Additional Causes: Other articles highlight additional factors that can contribute to orthostatic hypotension, including certain medications, neurological disorders, and blood volume deficiencies.
  • Clinical Trials and Research: PubMed provides information on ongoing clinical trials and research efforts aimed at improving the understanding and treatment of orthostatic hypotension.

Support and Resources

It is essential for patients and healthcare professionals to have access to reliable information and resources on orthostatic hypotension. PubMed offers a wealth of scientific articles that can serve as valuable references for healthcare decision-making.

  • Advocacy Groups: Some publications highlight the role of advocacy groups in supporting patients with orthostatic hypotension and raising awareness about the condition.
  • Cardiology and Neurology Centers: Articles also provide information on specialized centers that focus on diagnosing and treating orthostatic hypotension.
  • Patient Support: PubMed articles may include information on support groups, online forums, and other resources available to patients with orthostatic hypotension.

Conclusion

The scientific articles available on PubMed provide a comprehensive overview of orthostatic hypotension, its causes, diagnosis, and treatment options. Researchers and healthcare professionals can utilize these articles to stay updated with the latest discoveries and advancements in managing this condition.

References

References to cited articles can be found on PubMed and clinicaltrialsgov, which provide further information on specific studies and research papers.

References

  • Stewart JM. Orthostatic Hypotension. New England Journal of Medicine. 2015;373(6):568-576.
  • Shannon JR, Wei JY. Orthostatic Hypotension in the Elderly: Management Strategies. Drugs & Aging. 2000;16(1):33-46.
  • Low PA, Opfer-Gehrking TL, Textor SC, et al. Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS). Neurology. 1995;45(4 Suppl 5):S19-25.
  • Orthostatic Hypotension. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/All-Disorders/Orthostatic-Hypotension-Information-Page. Published 2019. Accessed October 30, 2019.
  • Orthostatic Hypotension. Mayo Clinic. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/orthostatic-hypotension/symptoms-causes/syc-20352548. Published 2019. Accessed October 30, 2019.
  • Orthostatic Hypotension. Postural Tachycardia Syndrome Patient Care Handbook. Dysautonomia International. Accessed October 30, 2019.
  • Orthostatic Hypotension. Genetics Home Reference. U.S. National Library of Medicine. https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/orthostatic-hypotension. Published 2019. Accessed October 30, 2019.
  • Orthostatic Hypotension. Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/9433/orthostatic-hypotension. Published 2019. Accessed October 30, 2019.
  • Orthostatic Hypotension. Pubmed.gov. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=orthostatic+hypotension. Accessed October 30, 2019.
Peter Reeves

By Peter Reeves

Australian National Genomic Information Service, including the database of BioManager, has been maintained for a long time by Peter Reeves, a professor at the University of Sydney. Professor Reeves is internationally renowned for his genetic analysis of enteric bacteria. He determined the genetic basis of the enormous variation in O antigens.