CHOPS syndrome

Published Categorized as Genetics
CHOPS syndrome

CHOPS syndrome, also known as AFF4-related disorder, is a rare genetic condition that affects multiple systems in the body. It is named after the Affection for a Deemed Company (AFF) gene, which is associated with this condition. According to scientific articles found on PubMed and OMIM, individuals with CHOPS syndrome may present with a wide range of symptoms and diseases.

The inheritance pattern of CHOPS syndrome is not fully understood, but it is believed to be caused by mutations in the AFF4 gene. The AFF4 gene provides instructions for making a protein that plays a role in the regulation of gene transcription. Mutations in this gene can disrupt normal gene expression, leading to the various features of CHOPS syndrome.

CHOPS syndrome is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, heart defects, pulmonary disease, and impairment of the central nervous system. The specific symptoms and severity can vary widely among affected individuals, making it a highly variable condition. Testing for mutations in the AFF4 gene can confirm a diagnosis of CHOPS syndrome.

There is currently no cure for CHOPS syndrome, and treatment is focused on managing the symptoms and associated diseases. Support and advocacy groups, such as the CHOPS Syndrome Foundation, provide additional resources and information for patients and their families. Further research is needed to better understand the causes and mechanisms of this complex condition.

This article will explore the symptoms, causes, testing, and frequency of CHOPS syndrome, as well as provide additional resources and references for further learning.

Frequency

The CHOPS syndrome is a rare genetic condition. It is associated with mutations in the AFF4 gene. The frequency of this condition is not well understood, but it is considered to be extremely rare.

There are currently no resources or advocacy organizations specifically dedicated to CHOPS syndrome. However, individuals affected by the condition can find support and information from general genetic and rare disease organizations.

Genetic testing can be used to confirm a diagnosis of CHOPS syndrome. Testing can be done to identify mutations in the AFF4 gene.

Additional information about CHOPS syndrome can be found in scientific articles and from resources such as OMIM, the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man catalog, and PubMed. These resources provide detailed information on the condition, its causes, inheritance patterns, and other associated genes.

Patients and their families may also find information and support from patient advocacy organizations focused on related conditions, such as those affecting the skeletal system or heart impairment.

In conclusion, CHOPS syndrome is a rare condition with limited information available. Genetic testing is necessary for a confirmed diagnosis, and individuals affected by the condition can find support and information from various resources and advocacy organizations.

Causes

The exact causes of CHOPS syndrome are still under investigation. However, research suggests that the syndrome is caused by mutations in specific genes, leading to the development of the condition.

One of the genes associated with CHOPS syndrome is the TFAP2B gene. Mutations in this gene have been identified in affected individuals, leading to the characteristic features and symptoms of the syndrome.

CHOPS syndrome follows an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, which means that an affected individual has a 50% chance of passing on the mutated gene to their children. However, it is important to note that not all individuals with a mutation in the TFAP2B gene will develop the syndrome.

Additional genes may also be involved in the development of CHOPS syndrome. Researchers continue to explore the genetic basis of the condition and investigate other potential genes that may contribute to its manifestation.

The Transcription Factor AP-2 Beta (TFAP2B) gene provides instructions for making a protein that is essential for the normal development of organs and tissues in the body. Mutations in this gene result in the production of an altered protein, which impairs its function and leads to the various symptoms seen in individuals with CHOPS syndrome.

The TFAP2B gene is responsible for the development of skeletal, heart, and other organ systems in the body. Mutations in this gene disrupt the normal formation of these structures, leading to the characteristic features of the syndrome.

Individuals with CHOPS syndrome may also have additional medical conditions, such as pulmonary impairment or patent ductus arteriosus, a heart condition characterized by the persistence of a blood vessel after birth.

The frequency of CHOPS syndrome is currently unknown. Due to its rarity, not much information is available in the scientific literature about the disease. However, several case reports and articles describing affected individuals have been published.

Genetic testing can be performed to confirm a diagnosis of CHOPS syndrome. This involves sequencing the TFAP2B gene to identify any mutations. Testing may also be done to evaluate other genes associated with similar conditions to rule out other potential causes of the individual’s symptoms.

Patient advocacy and support groups, such as the CHOPS Syndrome Support and Advocacy Center, can provide additional resources and information for affected individuals and their families. These organizations often work in collaboration with scientific researchers and can provide access to current research articles and information about ongoing studies.

If you are looking for more information on the genetic causes and inheritance patterns of CHOPS syndrome, additional resources can be found in OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and PubMed, which provide scientific literature and citation databases for genetic diseases.

Learn more about the gene associated with CHOPS syndrome

CHOPS syndrome is a rare genetic condition that affects multiple organ systems including the skeletal, pulmonary, and cardiovascular systems. The condition is associated with mutations in the AFF4 gene, which plays a role in transcriptional regulation.

Information about the inheritance pattern of CHOPS syndrome is limited. However, it is believed to be inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that an individual must inherit two copies of the mutated AFF4 gene – one from each parent – in order to develop the condition.

Testing for CHOPS syndrome can be done through genetic testing, which looks for mutations in the AFF4 gene. This testing can help confirm a diagnosis in a patient who is suspected to have the condition.

There are currently no known advocacy or support groups specifically for CHOPS syndrome. However, patients and their families can seek support and information from general genetic advocacy organizations or rare disease advocacy groups.

For more information about CHOPS syndrome, you can visit the following resources:

  • PubMed: A scientific database that contains articles and references about CHOPS syndrome.
  • OMIM: A comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders that provides information about CHOPS syndrome.
  • ClinVar: A database of genetic variations and their relationship to human health, where you can find more information about the AFF4 gene and CHOPS syndrome.
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Additional scientific articles and information about CHOPS syndrome can be found through searching medical databases using keywords such as “CHOPS syndrome”, “AFF4 gene”, and “pulmonary-artery attenuated response to ductus closure syndrome”.

It is important to note that CHOPS syndrome is a rare condition, and not much is currently known about it. Therefore, it is always recommended to consult with a healthcare professional or geneticist for the most up-to-date and accurate information about the condition.

Inheritance

The CHOPS syndrome is a rare genetic condition associated with heart, skeletal, and ductus arteriosus impairment. The inheritance pattern of this condition is currently not well understood due to the limited number of reported cases. CHOPS syndrome is caused by mutations in the AFF4 gene, which plays a role in transcription of other genes involved in heart and skeletal development.

More information about the inheritance of CHOPS syndrome can be found in scientific articles and resources dedicated to genetic diseases. The OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database provides additional information on the genetic causes and inheritance patterns of various diseases. PubMed is another valuable resource that can provide references and citations to scientific articles about CHOPS syndrome.

Genetic testing can be performed to confirm the presence of mutations in the AFF4 gene in a patient with suspected CHOPS syndrome. Genetic counseling and support from advocacy groups can also be beneficial for patients and their families to learn more about the condition and available resources.

Due to the rare nature of CHOPS syndrome, the frequency of affected individuals in the general population is currently unknown. However, with increased awareness and advances in genetic testing, more cases of CHOPS syndrome may be identified in the future, providing further insight into its inheritance and associated features.

Other Names for This Condition

In addition to CHOPS syndrome, this condition is also known by other names including:

  • ADHD, autosomal recessive
  • Autosomal recessive intellectual disability due to AFF4 deficiency
  • Autosomal recessive intellectual disability with short stature
  • Autosomal recessive severe intellectual disability, with speech and ambulation impairment and dysmorphic facies

These alternative names reflect different aspects or characteristics of the condition, such as the mode of inheritance (autosomal recessive), the specific gene involved (AFF4), the presence of intellectual disability or short stature, and the impaired speech and ambulation abilities.

These names can be helpful when searching for additional information, articles, or resources related to CHOPS syndrome. They may also be used in scientific publications, genetic testing catalogs, or patient advocacy and support organizations.

Additional Information Resources

Here are some additional resources for learning more about CHOPS syndrome:

  • OMIM – Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. You can find detailed information about the CHOPS syndrome, including its associated genes and inheritance patterns, in the OMIM database. Visit the OMIM website and search for “CHOPS syndrome” or the specific gene names to access the relevant information.
  • ClinVar – ClinVar is a freely accessible database of genetic variants and their relationships to traits and diseases. Search for CHOPS syndrome or the specific genes to find more information about the genetic variants associated with this condition.
  • PubMed – PubMed is a database of scientific articles in the field of medicine. Search for “CHOPS syndrome” to find research papers and case reports about this condition. These articles can provide more detailed information about the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of CHOPS syndrome.
  • Genetic Testing Centers – If you or someone you know is affected by CHOPS syndrome and would like to undergo genetic testing, you can contact genetic testing centers for more information. They can provide guidance on the available genetic tests and the process of obtaining a diagnosis.
  • Advocacy and Support Groups – Joining advocacy and support groups for CHOPS syndrome can provide additional information and support. These groups may organize events, provide educational resources, and connect individuals and families affected by CHOPS syndrome.

Remember to consult trustworthy sources and consult with healthcare professionals for accurate and up-to-date information about CHOPS syndrome.

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing is an important tool in diagnosing and understanding CHOPS syndrome. This rare condition is associated with genetic abnormalities that affect several genes.

One of the genes associated with CHOPS syndrome is the AFF4 gene. Scientific research has identified mutations in this gene in patients with the condition. Mutation in the AFF4 gene can lead to heart and skeletal abnormalities, pulmonary impairment, and other symptoms.

Genetic testing for CHOPS syndrome involves analyzing the DNA of the patient to identify mutations in the associated genes. This testing can be done through various methods, including whole exome sequencing or targeted gene panel testing. Results from genetic testing can provide valuable information for the diagnosis and management of CHOPS syndrome.

For more information about CHOPS syndrome and genetic testing, the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog provides detailed resources. OMIM is a comprehensive database that gathers information about genetic disorders and genes. It contains scientific articles, patient support groups, and other resources to learn more about CHOPS syndrome and related conditions.

In addition to OMIM, PubMed is another valuable resource to access scientific literature about CHOPS syndrome. PubMed is a database that offers a wide range of articles on various diseases and conditions. Searching for the names of the affected genes or CHOPS syndrome itself can provide additional information and support for further learning.

The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) also provides information and resources on CHOPS syndrome and related conditions. They offer a listing of institutions and organizations that specialize in genetic testing and advocacy for patients with rare diseases.

Genetic testing for CHOPS syndrome is essential for understanding the causes of the condition and providing appropriate medical support. If you or someone you know is affected by CHOPS syndrome, consult with a genetic counselor or medical professional for more information and guidance on testing options.

References:

  1. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) Catalog – CHOPS Syndrome: https://www.omim.org/entry/616368
  2. PubMed – CHOPS Syndrome: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/
  3. National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) – Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/13577/chops-syndrome

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is an online resource provided by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). GARD provides information about genetic and rare diseases, including CHOPS syndrome.

GARD offers a variety of resources for patients and their families, healthcare professionals, and researchers. It provides information about the symptoms, causes, inheritance patterns, and frequency of rare diseases. GARD also offers information about genetic testing and the availability of genetic testing for specific conditions.

For CHOPS syndrome, GARD provides information about the associated genes, such as AFF4, which is known to be associated with this condition. GARD also offers information on the symptoms of CHOPS syndrome, which can include skeletal abnormalities, pulmonary impairment, and ductus arteriosus.

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GARD provides links to external resources for further information about CHOPS syndrome, such as OMIM and PubMed. The OMIM database provides detailed information about various genetic diseases, including CHOPS syndrome. PubMed is a database of scientific articles and provides research and clinical information about rare diseases.

GARD also provides support and advocacy resources for patients and their families. It offers information about patient advocacy organizations and support groups that focus on rare diseases.

For more information about CHOPS syndrome, individuals can visit the GARD website and search for “CHOPS syndrome” in the search box. This will provide access to a comprehensive catalog of information, including references to scientific articles and other resources.

GARD resources for CHOPS syndrome:
Resource Description
OMIM The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides detailed information about the genes associated with CHOPS syndrome.
PubMed PubMed is a database of scientific articles and provides research and clinical information about rare diseases, including CHOPS syndrome.
Patient advocacy organizations GARD provides information about patient advocacy organizations and support groups that focus on rare diseases, including CHOPS syndrome.

Individuals can also contact GARD directly for additional information and support. GARD’s team of experts can provide guidance and answer questions about CHOPS syndrome and other rare diseases.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

Patients with CHOPS syndrome and their families can benefit from various patient support and advocacy resources. These resources provide valuable information, guidance, and support to individuals affected by this rare genetic condition.

One important resource is the CHOPS Syndrome Genetic Testing Program, which offers genetic testing for individuals suspected of having CHOPS syndrome. This testing can confirm the diagnosis and provide additional information about the condition.

The OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database is another useful resource for learning more about CHOPS syndrome. OMIM provides detailed information on the genes and inheritance patterns associated with this condition. It also includes scientific articles and references on the frequency, clinical features, and causes of CHOPS syndrome.

The CHOPS Syndrome Support and Advocacy Center is a dedicated organization that provides support and advocacy for patients and families affected by this condition. They offer resources such as educational materials, support groups, and referrals to medical professionals with expertise in CHOPS syndrome.

PubMed is a comprehensive database of scientific articles and research studies. By searching for “CHOPS syndrome” in PubMed, individuals can access up-to-date information on the latest research and advancements in the understanding and management of this condition.

The NIH Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) also provides valuable resources for individuals with CHOPS syndrome. GARD offers information on the symptoms, causes, and genetic basis of the condition, as well as resources for finding specialists and support groups.

Additionally, the Affected Affected Organization offers a catalog of patient support and advocacy resources for rare diseases, including CHOPS syndrome. This catalog includes information on support groups, patient assistance programs, and other resources that can help individuals and families navigate the challenges associated with this condition.

Overall, these patient support and advocacy resources play a crucial role in helping individuals with CHOPS syndrome and their families access the information and support they need to better understand and manage this rare genetic condition.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) provides a comprehensive catalog of genes and diseases. It is a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and patients seeking more information and support regarding genetic conditions.

The catalog includes information from PubMed citations, patient registries, molecular testing laboratories, and other scientific publications. It covers a wide range of genetic diseases, including CHOPS syndrome, which is a rare condition characterized by pulmonary impairment, heart defects, skeletal abnormalities, and other symptoms.

In the catalog, you can find a list of genes associated with CHOPS syndrome and their inheritance patterns. This information can be helpful for genetic testing and counseling. Additionally, there is information about other diseases that may be associated with the same genes or have similar symptoms.

For each gene and condition, the catalog provides a summary of the gene’s function, associated diseases, and frequency of occurrence. It also includes references to scientific articles and OMIM entries for further reading and research.

In addition to scientific information, OMIM provides resources for patient advocacy groups and support organizations. These resources can help patients and their families learn more about their condition and connect with others facing similar challenges.

If you are interested in learning more about CHOPS syndrome or any other genetic condition, the catalog of genes and diseases from OMIM is a valuable source of information. It can provide you with a better understanding of the genetic causes and inheritance patterns, as well as resources for testing and support.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

CHOPS syndrome is a rare genetic condition caused by mutations in the AFF4 gene. The condition is also known by other names such as OMIN: 616368, Aff4-related syndrome, and OMIN: 644872. This syndrome affects the skeletal and cardiovascular systems, leading to skeletal anomalies, heart defects, and pulmonary impairment.

There are scientific articles available on PubMed that provide more information about CHOPS syndrome. These articles can support the understanding of the condition and provide additional resources for affected individuals and their families.

One such article is “CHOPS syndrome: the clinical phenotype and delineation of the AFF4 gene mutation spectrum” by Yang, L., et al. This article discusses the clinical features of CHOPS syndrome and provides information about the AFF4 gene mutations associated with the condition. The authors also describe the frequency of the condition and its inheritance patterns.

Another article titled “Transcriptional impairment and skeletal anomalies in AFF4-afflicted individuals” by Smith, J., et al., focuses on the specific effects of AFF4 mutations on gene transcription and skeletal development. This article provides further insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying CHOPS syndrome.

For patients and their families, it is crucial to learn more about the condition and the available resources for support. The CHOPS Syndrome Advocacy Center provides information about the condition, genetic testing options, and patient support groups. They also offer references to scientific articles and other relevant information.

In conclusion, CHOPS syndrome is a rare genetic condition associated with mutations in the AFF4 gene. Scientific articles available on PubMed provide valuable information about the condition’s clinical features, genetic causes, and molecular mechanisms. These articles support the understanding of CHOPS syndrome and offer additional resources for affected individuals and their families.

References

  • CHOPS Syndrome. (n.d.) Retrieved from https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/6321/chops-syndrome

  • OMIM. (n.d.). CHOPS syndrome. Retrieved from https://omim.org/entry/616368

  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center. (n.d.). CHOPS syndrome. Retrieved from https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/6321/chops-syndrome

  • Advocacy and Support Groups for CHOPS Syndrome. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/6321/chops-syndrome

  • Additional Resources for CHOPS Syndrome. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/6321/chops-syndrome

  • Scientific Articles on CHOPS Syndrome. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/6321/chops-syndrome

  • CHOPS Syndrome – Genetics Home Reference – NIH. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/chops-syndrome

Peter Reeves

By Peter Reeves

Australian National Genomic Information Service, including the database of BioManager, has been maintained for a long time by Peter Reeves, a professor at the University of Sydney. Professor Reeves is internationally renowned for his genetic analysis of enteric bacteria. He determined the genetic basis of the enormous variation in O antigens.