ARG1 gene

Published Categorized as Genetics
ARG1 gene

The ARG1 gene is a genetic variant that plays a crucial role in the conversion of arginine to urea, an essential reaction for the body’s metabolism. This gene is responsible for the production of the enzyme arginase, which is necessary for breaking down excess arginine in the body. Deficiency in the ARG1 gene can lead to a condition known as arginase deficiency, which can cause a range of health problems.

Scientific articles and other resources related to the ARG1 gene provide valuable information for genetic testing and diagnosis of arginase deficiency. Additional tests and genetic catalog resources can help identify changes or variants in this gene and their potential impact on health. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) registry and PubMed are some of the sources where related research and scientific articles on the ARG1 gene can be found.

Arginase deficiency is a rare genetic disorder that affects the body’s ability to break down arginine. This condition can lead to high levels of arginine in the blood, which can cause various symptoms and health complications. Testing for mutations or changes in the ARG1 gene can help diagnose arginase deficiency and guide appropriate treatment strategies.

Vockley and other researchers have identified and studied various mutations and changes in the ARG1 gene that can cause arginase deficiency. Understanding these genetic variations can aid in the development of targeted therapies and interventions for individuals with this condition. The testing and analysis of the ARG1 gene are critical for accurate diagnosis and management of arginase deficiency.

In addition to arginase deficiency, alterations in the ARG1 gene have also been associated with other conditions and diseases. Scientific studies and health research have linked changes in this gene to metabolic disorders and relevant physiological processes. Further exploration of the ARG1 gene may lead to the discovery of new therapeutic targets and approaches for various diseases.

Health Conditions Related to Genetic Changes

Genetic changes in the ARG1 gene can lead to various health conditions and diseases related to arginase deficiency. Arginase is an enzyme produced by the ARG1 gene that plays a crucial role in the urea cycle, a biochemical pathway involved in the detoxification of ammonia in the body.

Health conditions related to genetic changes in the ARG1 gene can result in the accumulation of excess arginine and ammonia, leading to a variety of symptoms and complications. Some of the conditions associated with genetic changes in the ARG1 gene include:

  • Arginase deficiency: This is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the ARG1 gene, resulting in a complete or partial deficiency of arginase enzyme activity. It can cause symptoms such as intellectual disability, seizures, developmental delays, and progressive neurological problems.
  • Other urea cycle disorders: Genetic changes in other genes involved in the urea cycle can also lead to similar health conditions and symptoms.

Testing for genetic changes in the ARG1 gene can be done through various methods, including genetic testing and DNA analysis. These tests can provide valuable information about the presence of mutations or variations in the gene and help in the diagnosis and management of related health conditions.

Additional resources and information about the ARG1 gene and related health conditions can be found in various scientific databases, such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), PubMed, and other genetic testing registries. These resources catalog and list articles, references, and other information related to genetic changes in the ARG1 gene and its associated conditions.

Research articles and publications on the gene and its role in health conditions can provide further insights into the genetic changes and their effects. These articles can be found through scientific databases and literature searches.

Overall, genetic changes in the ARG1 gene can have significant implications for health, leading to conditions and diseases related to arginase deficiency. Understanding the genetic basis and mechanisms of these changes can help in developing better diagnostic and treatment strategies for affected individuals.

Arginase deficiency

Arginase deficiency is a rare genetic condition caused by changes in the ARG1 gene. The ARG1 gene provides instructions for making the enzyme arginase, which is involved in the urea cycle.

People with arginase deficiency have a reduced or absent amount of functional arginase enzyme, which leads to a buildup of arginine and a deficiency of urea in the body. This can cause a variety of health problems, including intellectual disability, delayed growth, seizures, and spasticity.

Arginase deficiency is listed in various databases and resources for genetic conditions, including OMIM, GeneReviews, and the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog of genes and genetic conditions. It is also listed on the Genetic Testing Registry (GTR), which provides information on genetic tests for various conditions.

Testing for arginase deficiency typically involves genetic testing to identify changes or variants in the ARG1 gene. Additional tests may be performed to measure the levels of arginine and other related substances in the blood or urine.

See also  VCAN gene

There are no known cures for arginase deficiency, but treatment focuses on managing symptoms and preventing complications. This may include dietary restrictions, medications to manage seizures or spasticity, and supportive therapies.

Scientific articles on arginase deficiency can be found in PubMed, a database of biomedical literature. These articles provide additional information on the clinical features, genetic changes, and treatment options for arginase deficiency. References to these articles can be found in the resources listed above.

In addition to arginase deficiency, excess or deficiency of arginine can also be associated with other diseases and conditions. Understanding the role of the arginase gene and related genes in these conditions may provide insights into new treatment approaches and potential genetic targets.

Other Names for This Gene

The ARG1 gene may also be referred to by other names, including:

  • Arginase-1 gene
  • ARG gene
  • Arginase deficiency
  • ARG1 gene variant
  • Arginine onglycinase
  • Arginase-1 deficiency
  • Arginase deficiency, genetic
  • Excess arginine
  • Vockley-Arginase deficiency

These names may be used in scientific articles, databases, and resources related to the health and genetic testing of this gene. Additional information about this gene and its related conditions can be found in the OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) registry, as well as in other scientific references and publications listed in the PubMed database. Genetic testing and reaction tests for ARG1 gene deficiency or changes can be conducted to identify and diagnose diseases and conditions related to this gene.

Additional Information Resources

For additional information on the ARG1 gene and related genetic conditions, please refer to the resources listed below:

  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM): OMIM is a catalog of human genes and genetic disorders. The OMIM entry for the ARG1 gene provides detailed information on the gene, its variant names, and associated genetic diseases.
  • GeneTests: GeneTests is a medical genetics information resource that provides information on genes, genetic testing, and related genetic conditions. The GeneTests database includes information on the ARG1 gene and its associated genetic disorders.
  • Registry of Genes and Genetic Diseases (REGARD): REGARD is a database that provides information on genes, genetic diseases, and related resources. The REGARD database includes information on the ARG1 gene and its associated genetic disorders.
  • National Institutes of Health (NIH): The NIH website provides information on various genetic disorders and research. You can find information on arginine deficiency and related genetic conditions on the NIH website.
  • Articles and Other References: There are scientific articles and other references available that provide in-depth information on the ARG1 gene and related genetic conditions. These resources can be found through scientific journals and databases.

These resources can provide a wealth of information on the ARG1 gene, its variant names, associated genetic diseases, testing procedures, and more. By exploring these resources, you can further understand the role of this gene in arginine deficiency and related conditions.

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) is a resource provided by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) that provides information about genetic tests and their associated conditions. In the case of the ARG1 gene, there are several tests listed in the GTR that are relevant to arginase deficiency.

The ARG1 gene, also known as arginine decarboxylase, is responsible for the production of the enzyme arginase. Arginase helps convert the amino acid arginine into urea and ornithine. Mutations or changes in the ARG1 gene can lead to arginase deficiency, which can cause a buildup of arginine and lead to a variety of health conditions.

In the Genetic Testing Registry, there are multiple tests listed for the ARG1 gene. These tests can detect various changes or variants in the gene that may be associated with arginase deficiency. The tests are designed to identify specific changes in the ARG1 gene and can be useful in diagnosing or confirming a diagnosis of arginase deficiency.

The GTR provides additional information about each test, including laboratory names, test names, scientific articles and references, and related diseases or conditions. This information can be valuable for healthcare professionals and individuals seeking more information about testing for arginase deficiency.

In addition to the Genetic Testing Registry, there are other resources available for information about the ARG1 gene and arginase deficiency. PubMed is a database of scientific articles and references that can provide further information on the topic. OMIM, or Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, is another resource that provides detailed information about genetic conditions and genes, including arginase deficiency.

Overall, the Genetic Testing Registry and other related databases are valuable resources for those interested in learning more about the ARG1 gene, arginase deficiency, and the genetic tests available for detecting changes in this gene.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Excess arginase activity can lead to health issues and arginase deficiency can cause significant metabolic changes.

Testing for arginase deficiency and other related genetic changes can be done using resources available on PubMed.

  • The ARG1 gene, listed in the genetic databases, is one of the genes associated with arginase deficiency.
  • Other genes related to this condition can also be found in the databases.
  • Scientific articles on PubMed provide additional information on the genetic tests, reactions, and variant genes associated with arginase deficiency.
  • The OMIM database and other registries also contain valuable information on this genetic condition.
See also  Fragile XE syndrome

Scientists can use PubMed to access a wide range of articles and references on arginase deficiency and related diseases.

Furthermore, PubMed provides a catalog of scientific articles and resources for testing, diagnosing, and managing conditions related to arginase deficiency.

Scientific Articles on PubMed
Excess arginase activity and its impact on health
Genetic testing for arginase deficiency and its variants
Reactions and changes in the ARG1 gene in response to arginase deficiency
Other genes and conditions related to arginine metabolism

By utilizing the information available through PubMed, scientists can gain a better understanding of arginase deficiency and related conditions, which can aid in the development of effective treatments and interventions.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

The Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a comprehensive resource for testing and information on genetic conditions. OMIM, curated by Dr. Victor A. McKusick and currently maintained by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, is a well-known database of genetic information. It provides detailed information on genes, their associated diseases, and the genetic changes that lead to these conditions.

In the context of the ARG1 gene, the OMIM database lists several conditions related to deficiency in arginase, an enzyme produced by this gene. These conditions include Argininemia, Hyperargininemia, and Arginase Deficiency. The OMIM catalog provides information on the symptoms, genetic changes, and available tests for these diseases.

The OMIM database also provides references to scientific articles and publications from PubMed and other genetic resources. These references allow researchers and healthcare professionals to delve deeper into the genetic aspects of these diseases and stay updated with the latest research in the field.

For individuals seeking more information about genetic conditions related to the ARG1 gene, the OMIM catalog serves as a valuable resource. It provides a registry of genes and diseases, allowing users to explore not only the effects of changes in the ARG1 gene but also other genes and their associated diseases.

In addition to genetic information, the OMIM catalog also offers resources for individuals undergoing testing and health professionals seeking comprehensive information. These resources include genetic testing laboratories, clinical laboratories specializing in genetic testing, and other relevant services.

Overall, the Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM is a vital tool for understanding the genetic basis of various diseases. It serves as a comprehensive reference for healthcare professionals, researchers, and individuals seeking information on genetic conditions. By providing detailed information, scientific articles, and references, OMIM contributes to advancements in genetic research and the improvement of healthcare practice.

Gene and Variant Databases

Genes are sequences of DNA that encode instructions for building and maintaining an organism. The ARG1 gene is responsible for producing arginase, an enzyme that helps break down the amino acid arginine. Deficiency in the ARG1 gene can lead to a condition called arginase deficiency, which can cause excess arginine in the body and related health problems.

There are several gene and variant databases available that provide additional scientific information about the ARG1 gene and its associated variants:

  1. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM): OMIM is a database that provides information on genetic conditions and related genes. It includes detailed descriptions, clinical features, and references to scientific articles on arginase deficiency and other genetic diseases.
  2. PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research papers. Searching for “ARG1 gene” or “arginase deficiency” on PubMed can provide access to relevant studies and publications.
  3. Genetic Testing Registry (GTR): GTR is a centralized resource for genetic testing information. It provides a catalog of genetic tests and the laboratories that offer them. Information on genetic testing for arginase deficiency and related conditions can be found in the GTR.
  4. ARG1 gene variant databases: There are specific databases that focus on variants in the ARG1 gene. These databases list known genetic changes, also known as variants or mutations, in the ARG1 gene and provide information about their clinical significance and associated conditions.

In addition to these databases, there are other resources available as well, such as genetic counseling services, patient support groups, and disease-specific organizations. These resources can provide further information and support for individuals and families affected by arginase deficiency and related conditions.

It is important to consult with healthcare professionals and geneticists for accurate and up-to-date information regarding genetic testing, diagnosis, and management of arginase deficiency and related conditions.

References

  • ARG1 gene listed in the genetic catalog: Variant
  • For testing and additional information on this gene, see the resources at OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) related to Arginase deficiency and other related diseases
  • Additional scientific articles on the ARG1 gene can be found on PubMed
  • For information on genetic testing and changes in the ARG1 gene associated with various conditions and excess arginine levels, refer to the Registry of Genes and Diseases (GeneTests)
  • Other databases and registries may also have information on the ARG1 gene and related conditions, such as the Genetic Testing Registry and Health Information resources provided by the National Institutes of Health
  • Please note that the names of genes and genetic variants may vary across different resources and databases
Peter Reeves

By Peter Reeves

Australian National Genomic Information Service, including the database of BioManager, has been maintained for a long time by Peter Reeves, a professor at the University of Sydney. Professor Reeves is internationally renowned for his genetic analysis of enteric bacteria. He determined the genetic basis of the enormous variation in O antigens.