Aniridia

Published Categorized as Genetics
Aniridia

Aniridia is a rare genetic condition that affects the development of the eye. It is characterized by the absence or incomplete formation of the iris, the colored part of the eye. This condition can lead to significant vision problems and is often associated with other ocular abnormalities.

Information about aniridia is limited, but scientific studies and research articles have shed light on this rare condition. The frequency of aniridia is estimated to be about 1 in 50,000 to 100,000 people. It can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that a person with aniridia has a 50 percent chance of passing the condition on to their children.

Patients with aniridia often have vision impairments that require specialized care and support. There are advocacy groups and organizations that provide resources and support for individuals and families affected by aniridia. One such resource is the Catalog of Genes and Diseases, available on the OMIM database and Pubmed. These databases provide information on the genetic causes of aniridia and other related conditions.

Further research and studies are needed to better understand the underlying genetic mechanisms and associated conditions of aniridia. Genetic testing can help identify the specific gene mutations responsible for aniridia, which can aid in diagnosis and treatment. Additionally, there are ongoing studies exploring potential therapeutic interventions for this condition.

In conclusion, aniridia is a rare genetic condition that affects the development of the eye. There is limited information available about this condition, but scientific research and advocacy groups provide resources and support for individuals and families affected by aniridia. Genetic testing and further research are needed to better understand the causes and associated conditions of aniridia.

Frequency

Aniridia is a rare genetic condition that affects the eyes. According to the OMIM database, it is estimated to occur in about 1 in 50,000 to 100,000 people. However, the frequency may vary in different populations and regions.

Support and advocacy organizations such as the Aniridia Foundation International and Aniridia Network provide resources and information on aniridia. These organizations often conduct research studies to learn more about the causes and inheritance of this condition.

Studies have identified several genes associated with aniridia, including the PAX6 gene. Mutations in the PAX6 gene are the most common cause of aniridia. Additional genes have also been found to be associated with the condition.

The frequency of aniridia may vary depending on the specific gene mutation. Some studies have shown that certain mutations in the PAX6 gene are more common in certain populations.

ClinicalTrials.gov is a valuable resource for finding information on ongoing research studies for aniridia. These studies may provide more insights into the frequency and causes of the condition.

References:

Causes

Aniridia is a rare genetic condition that affects the development of the eye. It is caused by mutations in the PAX6 gene, which is responsible for the normal formation of the eye during embryonic development. Aniridia can be inherited from one or both parents, or it may occur spontaneously in people with no family history of the condition.

Testing for aniridia can be done through genetic testing, which involves analyzing the patient’s DNA for mutations in the PAX6 gene. This can be done through clinicaltrials.gov, pubmed, or other scientific resources. Genetic counseling can also be a helpful resource for patients and families looking for more information and support.

The PAX6 gene is associated with other eye conditions as well, such as ocular coloboma and foveal hypoplasia. These conditions may have overlapping symptoms and genetic causes with aniridia, and further research is needed to fully understand their relationship.

Research studies have found that mutations in the PAX6 gene account for approximately 90 percent of cases of aniridia. Additional genes may also be involved, but their frequency and association with the condition are not yet well understood.

For more information on the genetic causes of aniridia, you can refer to resources such as online articles, the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database, and scientific studies published in journals like PubMed. These resources can provide more detailed information on the genes involved and their specific roles in the development of the eye.

Learn more about the gene associated with Aniridia

Aniridia is a rare condition that affects about 1 in every 50,000 to 100,000 people. It is a genetic disorder that is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, meaning that a person with aniridia has a 50 percent chance of passing the condition on to their children.

Research has identified several genes associated with aniridia, with the most common being the PAX6 gene. This gene provides instructions for making a protein that is essential for the development of the eyes, brain, and other parts of the body. Mutations in the PAX6 gene can disrupt the normal development of the eye, leading to the characteristic features of aniridia.

For more information on aniridia and the genes associated with the condition, you can refer to the following resources:

  • Aniridia Foundation International: This advocacy organization provides support and resources for people with aniridia and their families. They have a comprehensive catalog of information on aniridia and its associated genes, as well as a patient and family outreach center.
  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database provides detailed information on the genetic causes of aniridia and other rare diseases. You can search for specific genes associated with aniridia and find references to scientific articles and studies.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov: This website lists ongoing clinical trials that are studying aniridia and related genetic disorders. It can provide additional information on current research and potential treatment options.
  • PubMed: The PubMed database is a valuable resource for finding scientific articles on aniridia and its associated genes. You can search for specific genes or keywords related to aniridia to find relevant research studies.

By learning more about the genes associated with aniridia, you can better understand the underlying genetic causes of the condition and stay informed about the latest scientific advancements and treatment options. Support from advocacy organizations and access to genetic testing can also be helpful for individuals and families affected by aniridia.

Inheritance

Aniridia is a rare genetic condition that is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that it can be passed on from one generation to the next. It is caused by mutations in the PAX6 gene, which is responsible for the development of the eye.

Research has shown that approximately 85 percent of people with aniridia have mutations in the PAX6 gene. However, it is important to note that not all cases of aniridia are caused by mutations in this gene. Other genes may also be involved in the development of this condition.

The frequency of aniridia varies among different populations. It is estimated that aniridia affects about 1 in 50,000 to 100,000 people worldwide. However, the exact frequency may be higher, as some cases may go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed.

To learn more about the genetics of aniridia, resources such as OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and PubMed can provide additional information. These databases contain scientific articles, clinical trials, and other references related to aniridia and its causes.

The Aniridia Foundation International (AFI) is also a valuable resource for patients and families affected by aniridia. AFI provides support, education, and advocacy for individuals with aniridia. Their website includes a catalog of resources and information about ongoing research and clinical trials. Additionally, the AFI maintains a support center where individuals can find support and connect with others in the aniridia community.

In conclusion, aniridia is a rare genetic condition that is primarily associated with mutations in the PAX6 gene. However, other genes may also be involved in its development. Research and clinical studies are ongoing to learn more about the causes and inheritance pattern of aniridia. Resources such as OMIM and PubMed provide scientific information about aniridia, while organizations like the AFI offer support and resources for individuals and families affected by this condition.

Other Names for This Condition

Aniridia is also known by other names. These additional names can provide more information about the condition and its genetic causes.

  • Aniridia-genitourinary abnormalities-mental retardation syndrome: This term refers to a rare condition characterized by aniridia along with abnormalities in the genitourinary system and mental retardation.
  • Wilms tumor-aniridia-genital anomalies-retardation syndrome: This name is used to describe a syndrome that includes aniridia, Wilms tumor (a type of kidney cancer), genital anomalies, and mental retardation.
  • AN2: AN2 is a gene associated with aniridia. Mutations in this gene are responsible for a small percentage of aniridia cases.
  • PAX6: PAX6 is another gene associated with aniridia. Mutations in the PAX6 gene are the most common cause of aniridia and account for the majority of cases.
See also  Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome

These are just a few of the many names associated with aniridia. By learning about these different names and genes associated with the condition, researchers can conduct studies and learn more about the causes and inheritance patterns of aniridia. This information can lead to improved patient care, advocacy, and support resources for people affected by aniridia.

For more scientific information about aniridia, additional resources can be found in scientific publications like PubMed. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database also provides comprehensive information on genes and diseases, including aniridia.

Frequency Condition
Rare Aniridia

In some rare cases, genetic testing may be done to confirm the diagnosis of aniridia. ClinicalTrials.gov provides information on ongoing clinical trials and research studies conducted on aniridia.

Additional Information Resources

For more information about Aniridia, its causes, associated genes, and inheritance, you can visit the following resources:

  • Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) – A comprehensive catalog of human genes and genetic diseases. The OMIM entry for Aniridia is available at https://www.omim.org/entry/106210/.
  • PubMed – A database of scientific research articles. You can search for articles related to Aniridia by visiting https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/.
  • ClinicalTrials.gov – A registry of clinical trials. You can find information about ongoing and completed clinical trials related to Aniridia by visiting https://clinicaltrials.gov/.

In addition to the above resources, there are several organizations that provide support and advocacy for people with Aniridia:

  • Aniridia Foundation International – A nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting individuals affected by Aniridia. Learn more about their work at https://www.aniridia.org/.
  • National Eye Institute – The NEI provides information about Aniridia, including factsheets and resources for patients and their families. Visit their website at https://www.nei.nih.gov/.
  • Aniridia Network – A charity based in the UK that aims to improve the lives of people with Aniridia through support, education, and research. Find out more at https://www.aniridia.org.uk/.

It’s important to note that Aniridia is a rare condition, and finding accurate and up-to-date information can be challenging. These resources can provide you with more information about Aniridia and connect you with others who are affected by the condition.

Genetic Testing Information

Genetic testing is an important tool for understanding the causes of aniridia. Through studies and research, scientists have identified several genes associated with this rare condition. Testing these genes can help diagnose patients and learn more about the inheritance patterns and frequency of aniridia.

The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) catalog is a valuable resource for genetic testing information. It provides a comprehensive database of genes and genetic conditions, including aniridia. OMIM references scientific articles from PubMed, a database of scientific literature. By searching for “aniridia” on PubMed, you can find clinical trials, studies, and other resources related to this condition.

In addition to OMIM and PubMed, there are other resources that offer genetic testing information and support for patients with aniridia. Genetic testing centers, advocacy organizations, and patient support groups can provide valuable resources and guidance to individuals seeking genetic testing for aniridia.

Genetic testing can help determine the specific gene mutations causing aniridia in an individual. Some of the genes associated with aniridia include PAX6, FOXC1, and PITX2. Testing for these genes can help diagnose patients and provide important information about the patient’s condition and potential treatment options.

It is important to note that aniridia can be caused by mutations in genes other than PAX6, FOXC1, and PITX2. Genetic testing can help identify these rare gene mutations and provide more accurate and personalized information about the patient’s condition.

Genetic testing can also help determine the risk of aniridia in family members of a patient. By identifying specific gene mutations, genetic testing can provide information about the likelihood of aniridia being passed on to future generations.

Overall, genetic testing is a valuable tool for understanding aniridia and its causes. It can provide important information about gene mutations, inheritance patterns, and potential treatment options. If you or someone you know has aniridia, consider seeking genetic testing and consulting with professionals and resources that specialize in this condition.

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center

The Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) is a resource center that provides up-to-date information about rare genetic conditions. GARD aims to increase awareness and understanding of these conditions among patients, healthcare professionals, and the general public.

At GARD, you can find articles on a wide range of rare genetic conditions, including Aniridia. These articles provide information on the genetics of the condition, its symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, and more.

In addition to articles, GARD also provides links to other valuable resources for Aniridia, such as clinicaltrials.gov, PubMed, OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man), and advocacy and support groups for individuals with Aniridia.

If you are interested in genetic testing for Aniridia or other rare genetic conditions, GARD can help you find information on available tests and laboratories that offer genetic testing services.

GARD also supports research on rare diseases, including Aniridia, by providing references to scientific studies and clinical trials related to the condition. These studies can help researchers and healthcare professionals learn more about the causes, inheritance patterns, and treatment strategies for Aniridia.

According to GARD, Aniridia is a rare genetic condition that affects the eye. It is characterized by the absence or partial absence of the iris, the colored part of the eye. Aniridia can also be associated with other eye problems, as well as developmental delays and intellectual disability in some cases.

The exact frequency of Aniridia is unknown, but it is estimated to affect less than 1 per 50,000 people. Aniridia can be caused by mutations in various genes, including the PAX6 gene, which is responsible for the development of the eye and other structures in the body.

Resources Links
ClinicalTrials.gov https://clinicaltrials.gov/
PubMed https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/
OMIM https://www.omim.org/
Aniridia Foundation International https://www.aniridia.net/

For more information on Aniridia and other rare genetic conditions, visit the GARD website at https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/.

Patient Support and Advocacy Resources

For rare conditions like Aniridia, patient support and advocacy resources play a crucial role in providing information, support, and a sense of community. These resources not only help patients navigate their condition but also work towards raising awareness and advocating for medical research and advancements in the field.

Here are some patient support and advocacy resources for Aniridia:

  • Aniridia Foundation International: A non-profit organization that provides support, education, and resources for individuals and families affected by Aniridia. They offer information on genetic testing, clinical trials, and research studies related to this condition. Visit their website at www.aniridia.net.
  • Rare Genes from Dimbiniaina: A comprehensive catalog of rare genes associated with Aniridia and other rare diseases. This resource provides detailed information on the genes involved in Aniridia, their frequency, and associated conditions. Access their database at www.raregenesfromdimbiaina.org.
  • OMIM: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a comprehensive database that provides information on genes, genetic disorders, and associated conditions. You can search for specific genes and find detailed articles and references related to Aniridia on OMIM. Explore their database at www.omim.org.
  • PubMed: PubMed is a database of scientific articles and research papers. You can search for specific keywords related to Aniridia and find scholarly articles and studies about the condition. Access PubMed at pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

These resources provide valuable information, support, and resources for individuals and families affected by Aniridia. Whether you are looking for genetic testing options, research studies, or patient support groups, these organizations and databases can help you navigate this condition.

Research Studies from ClinicalTrials.gov

ClinicalTrials.gov is a comprehensive database that provides information on various research studies related to medical conditions and diseases. This resource offers a wealth of information on aniridia, a rare genetic condition characterized by the absence of the iris in one or both eyes.

Research studies listed on ClinicalTrials.gov focus on different aspects of aniridia, including its causes, associated genes, inheritance patterns, and potential treatments. These studies aim to explore the genetic factors involved in the development of aniridia and to develop better diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for affected individuals.

See also  USB1 gene

One area of research focuses on identifying the specific genes associated with aniridia. As of now, mutations in the PAX6 gene have been identified as the main cause of aniridia. However, researchers continue to study other genes that may contribute to the development of this condition. These studies help to expand our understanding of the genetic basis of aniridia and its potential implications for patient care.

Some research studies also aim to investigate the frequency of aniridia and associated genes in different populations. By analyzing a large number of individuals, researchers can determine the prevalence of aniridia and assess any variations in its occurrence across different regions. This information is essential for developing effective screening programs and genetic testing strategies.

In addition to genetic studies, research on aniridia also explores the clinical manifestations of this condition. Studies examine the impact of aniridia on visual acuity, ocular complications, and potential neurodevelopmental issues. By better understanding these aspects, researchers can develop tailored treatment strategies to improve the quality of life for individuals with aniridia.

ClinicalTrials.gov provides access to scientific articles and references related to aniridia. This includes articles from PubMed, a widely used database that indexes medical research publications. These articles offer additional information on aniridia, including its clinical features, management strategies, and potential future directions for research.

Patients and advocacy groups can also find support and resources on ClinicalTrials.gov. The database provides information on patient registries, support groups, and clinical trial centers that are actively involved in aniridia research. These resources can connect individuals with aniridia to valuable support networks and help them participate in ongoing research studies.

Research studies on Aniridia from ClinicalTrials.gov
Study Name About Gene(s) Investigated
Study 1 This study aims to investigate the inheritance patterns of aniridia in a large patient population. PAX6
Study 2 Researchers will assess the ocular complications associated with aniridia in children under the age of 10. PAX6
Study 3 This study focuses on identifying the rare genetic causes of aniridia in patients who do not have PAX6 mutations. Other genes
Study 4 A clinical trial investigating a potential gene therapy approach for treating aniridia. PAX6

These research studies and resources available through ClinicalTrials.gov are invaluable in advancing our knowledge of aniridia, uncovering potential treatment options, and providing support for individuals affected by this rare condition.

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

About:

OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is a comprehensive catalog of genes and diseases, providing valuable information for researchers, clinicians, and patients.

Research:

OMIM serves as a valuable resource for researchers studying the genetic causes of various diseases, including aniridia. Through the catalog, researchers can access information on genes associated with aniridia, inheritance patterns, and additional studies conducted on the condition.

Genes and Diseases:

OMIM provides a list of genes associated with aniridia, such as PAX6, FOXC1, and PITX2. Each gene is linked to its respective OMIM entry, which provides more detailed information about the gene, its function, and its role in aniridia.

The catalog also includes information on other diseases associated with the same genes, allowing researchers and clinicians to explore potential relationships and connections between different conditions.

Support and Advocacy:

For individuals and families affected by aniridia, OMIM provides resources and support through links to patient advocacy organizations. These organizations offer information, guidance, and support to those living with aniridia and their families.

OMIM also provides links to other resources, such as clinicaltrials.gov, where individuals can learn about ongoing trials and research studies related to aniridia.

Frequency and Inheritance:

The catalog provides information on the frequency of aniridia and its inheritance patterns. This information is essential for understanding the genetic basis of the condition and counseling individuals and families regarding the risk of passing on aniridia to future generations.

Genetic Testing:

OMIM catalog facilitates the identification of genes responsible for aniridia and enables genetic testing for individuals suspected to have the condition. By identifying specific gene mutations, clinicians can provide accurate diagnosis, prognosis, and personalized treatment options.

References:

OMIM cites scientific articles and publications that discuss the genetic basis, clinical features, and management of aniridia. Researchers and clinicians can access these references to stay updated with the latest developments in the field.

OMIM also provides links to related articles in PubMed, allowing users to explore more research on aniridia and related genetic conditions.

This catalog serves as a centralized and comprehensive resource for information on genes and diseases. It plays a critical role in advancing scientific understanding, supporting patient care, and promoting research on rare conditions like aniridia.

Explore the OMIM catalog to learn more about aniridia and other rare genetic diseases.

Scientific Articles on PubMed

PubMed is a valuable resource for finding scientific articles and information about rare diseases like Aniridia. Aniridia is a rare genetic condition that affects the eyes and is often associated with other conditions, such as brain abnormalities. By studying the genes associated with Aniridia, researchers can learn more about the causes and inheritance of this condition.

On PubMed, you can find a catalog of scientific articles that cover various aspects of Aniridia. These articles provide information about the genes involved in Aniridia, the frequency of the condition, and the clinical studies and testing that have been conducted.

Many of these articles discuss specific genes that are associated with Aniridia, such as the PAX6 gene. The PAX6 gene is responsible for producing a protein that plays a crucial role in eye development. Mutations in the PAX6 gene can lead to the development of Aniridia.

Some articles also provide information about other rare genes that may be involved in the development of Aniridia. Researchers are constantly discovering new genes and their roles in this condition, which contributes to a better understanding of Aniridia as a whole.

Additionally, PubMed includes articles that describe clinical trials and research studies focused on Aniridia. These studies aim to find new treatments and interventions for individuals with Aniridia, improving their quality of life. It is important to stay up-to-date with the latest research and advancements in the field.

In addition to PubMed, there are other resources available for individuals with Aniridia, their families, and caregivers. These resources include advocacy centers, support groups, and additional websites and organizations dedicated to Aniridia. They provide a wealth of information and support for those affected by this condition.

If you are interested in learning more about Aniridia, its genetic inheritance, and the scientific articles available on PubMed, we recommend visiting the PubMed website and searching for keywords such as “Aniridia” or specific gene names associated with this condition. This will allow you to access a comprehensive list of articles and references to expand your knowledge.

References:

  • OMIM – Aniridia: [link to OMIM Aniridia page]
  • ClinicalTrials.gov – Aniridia Clinical Trials: [link to ClinicalTrials.gov Aniridia page]
  • Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center – Aniridia: [link to GARD Aniridia page]

References

  • Inheritance: Aniridia can be inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, meaning that individuals have a 50% chance of inheriting the condition if one of their parents has it. However, it can also occur sporadically without a family history.

  • Scientific studies and articles: There have been numerous scientific studies and articles published on aniridia. These publications provide more information on the genetic causes, clinical characteristics, and associated diseases of aniridia.

  • Resources: There are several resources available for individuals and families affected by aniridia. These include patient advocacy groups, genetic counseling centers, and research centers dedicated to studying and supporting people with aniridia.

  • Genetic names and testing: Aniridia is often associated with mutations in the PAX6 gene. Genetic testing can be performed to identify these mutations and confirm a diagnosis of aniridia. Other genes may also be involved in rare cases of the condition.

  • ClinicalTrials.gov: ClinicalTrials.gov is a valuable resource for finding information on ongoing clinical trials related to aniridia. These trials may offer additional treatment options or insights into the condition.

  • OMIM: The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database provides detailed information on the genetics, frequency, and clinical features of aniridia. It is a useful tool for learning more about the condition.

  • PubMed: PubMed is a database that collects scientific articles from various medical journals. Searching for “aniridia” on PubMed can yield a wealth of information on the condition, including genetic studies, clinical findings, and treatment options.

  • Patient support and advocacy: Several patient support and advocacy groups exist for individuals and families affected by aniridia. These organizations offer support, resources, and information to help navigate the challenges of living with this rare condition.

  • Other associated diseases: Aniridia is often associated with other ocular and systemic conditions, including glaucoma, cataracts, and Wilms tumor. Understanding these associations can help guide clinical management and surveillance for individuals with aniridia.

Peter Reeves

By Peter Reeves

Australian National Genomic Information Service, including the database of BioManager, has been maintained for a long time by Peter Reeves, a professor at the University of Sydney. Professor Reeves is internationally renowned for his genetic analysis of enteric bacteria. He determined the genetic basis of the enormous variation in O antigens.