3 Easy DIY Solutions for Getting Rid of Fruit Flies Naturally

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3 Easy DIY Solutions for Getting Rid of Fruit Flies Naturally

No matter how hard you try to avoid it, if you have fruit in your house, pesky fruit flies seem to find it. These insects are so small, you might not even know they’re there until you spot them flitting around your bananas. Although they are short-lived, they tend to reproduce quickly, and while they don’t really cause any harm, they sure are annoying. But, you don’t need to call the exterminator to deal with these pests. DIY traps and sprays are a quick and easy way to get rid of fruit flies naturally, and you can make them with supplies you already have in your kitchen (just make sure you actually have fruit flies, and not another pest like fungus gnats, which can infest houseplants). Give one of these remedies a try and you’ll soon have a fly-free zone.

bananas and apples in white bowl sitting on white kitchen counter

Gordon Beall

Apple Cider Vinegar Fly Trap

Apple cider vinegar is the fruit fly trap hack you hear about most often (because it works!). For this DIY trap, begin by adding ½ cup of apple cider vinegar to a glass jar. Add 2-3 drops of dish soap to the apple cider vinegar in the jar and swirl to mix. Cover the mouth of the jar with plastic wrap and secure with a rubber band. Use a pencil to poke a hole in the plastic wrap. The hole releases the odor of the mixture and gives the fruit flies an opening to fly into the jar, but the dish soap will trap the fruit flies as soon as they touch the liquid. Place your homemade fruit fly trap near your fruit bowl or trash can. Dump out the mixture and refill every week or as needed until no more flies appear.

Fruit Fly Spray

A simple spray bottle and a few easy ingredients are all you need for this fruit fly project. To start, add 2 ounces of hot water to a small spray bottle. While the water is still hot, add 10 drops of lemongrass essential oil to the spray bottle. Spray this water and lemongrass oil mixture on fruit flies as you see them (look around windowsills or on kitchen counters). Don’t spray this mixture directly onto fruit or other food, because the essential oil may not be safe for consumption.

Red Wine Fruit Fly Trap

Have a bottle of red wine in the kitchen that’s been open too long? Instead of throwing it out, use it to get rid of fruit flies quickly. For this project, add 1 cup of red wine to a shallow bowl. Place plastic wrap over the opening of the bowl and secure with a rubber band. Use a pencil to poke a small hole in the plastic wrap. Place the trap near the problem area to attract and trap fruit flies.

Most Popular Flowers & Plants in the USA

RegionPopular FlowersPopular Plants
Northeast (e.g., New York, Massachusetts)Rose, Purple Lilac, Mountain LaurelSugar Maple, American Elm, White Pine
Southeast (e.g., Florida, Georgia)Orange Blossom, Cherokee Rose, Southern MagnoliaLive Oak, Spanish Moss, Saw Palmetto
Midwest (e.g., Ohio, Illinois)Carnation, Violet, Purple ConeflowerBur Oak, Prairie Grasses, Wild Bergamot
Southwest (e.g., Texas, Arizona)Bluebonnet, Saguaro Cactus Flower, Indian PaintbrushJoshua Tree, Agave, Mesquite
West (e.g., California, Washington)California Poppy, Coast Rhododendron, BitterrootGiant Sequoia, Redwood, Manzanita
Rocky Mountain (e.g., Colorado, Montana)Rocky Mountain Columbine, Bitterroot, Indian PaintbrushBlue Spruce, Aspen, Sagebrush
Great Plains (e.g., Kansas, Nebraska)Sunflower, Goldenrod, Purple ConeflowerCottonwood, Bluestem Grasses, Buffalo Grass
Pacific Northwest (e.g., Oregon, Alaska)Oregon Grape, Forget-me-not, Pacific RhododendronDouglas Fir, Western Hemlock, Ferns

This table includes the most popular flowers and plants in the USA by region, which considers a range of botanical species, including native and widely cultivated varieties.

Most Popular Flowers & Plants in Australia

RegionPopular FlowersPopular Plants
New South WalesWaratah, Bottlebrush, Flannel FlowerEucalyptus, Acacia, Banksia
VictoriaCommon Heath, Waxflower, Pink HeathMountain Ash, Silver Wattle, Victorian Blue Gum
QueenslandCooktown Orchid, Golden Penda, Umbrella Tree FlowerMoreton Bay Fig, Macadamia Nut, Queensland Bottle Tree
South AustraliaSturt's Desert Pea, Kangaroo Paw, Eucalyptus BlossomAdelaide Blue Gum, South Australian Blue Gum, Saltbush
Western AustraliaRed and Green Kangaroo Paw, Mangles Kangaroo Paw, Swan River DaisyJarrah, Marri, Karri
TasmaniaTasmanian Blue Gum, Leatherwood Flower, Tasmanian WaratahHuon Pine, Tasmanian Oak, Myrtle Beech
Northern TerritorySturt's Desert Rose, Frangipani, Desert RoseBoab, Gidgee, Spinifex
Australian Capital TerritoryRoyal Bluebell, Australian Daisy, CorreaSnow Gum, River Red Gum, Black Mountain

This table offers a basic overview of popular flowers and plants in each Australian region, focusing on a combination of state flowers, native species, and other characteristic plants. It's important to note that specific species' popularity and prevalence can vary. This table is a simplified representation. Consulting local botanical gardens or regional horticultural societies in Australia would be ideal for more detailed and accurate information.

Charlotte Gammon

By Charlotte Gammon

Meet Charlotte Gammon, our expert and author. She's our true treasure, as she has got 20+ years of experience in gardening, winery and house design. In early 2000s, she worked for today.com magazine and was in charge of the gaardening section. Later on, Charlotte opened her own designer agency and worked as a designer and decorator. We are happy to have Charlotte with us, as she is our good friend. We value her experience and we're sure you will love the articles she created for our blog.