13 Weeping Trees that Will Add Visual Interest to Your Landscape

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13 Weeping Trees that Will Add Visual Interest to Your Landscape

Weeping Juniper

Curving and dramatic weeping trees can introduce visual interest to any yard. These trees often appear to be leaning over, making it look like they’re weeping. There are many weeping trees to choose from, with profiles that differ in size, color, and shape.

Weeping Juniper

Weeping Juniper

‘Tolleson’s Blue Weeping’ Rocky Mountain juniper is stunning, offering blue-tinted evergreen needles on wonderfully weeping branches. Like other Rocky Mountain junipers, ‘Tolleson’s Blue Weeping’ is a small tree that’s very hardy and holds up to heat and drought. It’s native to North America.

Name: Juniperus scopulorum ‘Tolleson’s Blue Weeping’

Size: To 20 feet tall and 10 feet wide

Growing Conditions: Full sun and well-drained soil; this plant is drought tolerant.

Zones: 4-7

Native to North America: Yes

Weeping Purple Beech

Among the more dramatic weeping trees, ‘Purple Fountain’ beech bears bold, purple-black leaves in spring and summer that turn a coppery bronze in autumn. Being tall and skinny, it’s perfect for yards of any size.

Name: Fagus sylvatica ‘Purple Fountain’

Size: To 30 feet tall and 15 feet wide; very slow growing

Growing Conditions: Full sun or part shade and moist, well-drained soil

Zones: 5-7

Native to North America: No

Weeping Mulberry

A small tree that’s exceptionally easy to grow, weeping mulberry is commonly used by home gardeners and professional landscapers alike.

It features shiny green leaves and pendulous branches that can reach the ground.

Name: Morus alba ‘Chaparral’

Size: To 10 feet tall and 12 feet wide

Growing Conditions: Full sun and well-drained soil; the plant is drought tolerant.

Zones: 4-8

Native to North America: No

In some areas, this species of mulberry has shown invasive tendencies. Check local restrictions before planting it.

Weeping Blue Atlas Cedar

Weeping blue Atlas cedar is a delightful evergreen with silvery-blue needles and cascading branches. Young trees are sometimes trained into fun shapes, such as the serpentine pattern shown here. Untrained varieties grow large and have irregular forms. They’re usually the focal point of the landscape.

Name: Cedrus atlantica ‘Glacua Pendula’

Size: To 20 feet tall and wide

Growing Conditions: Full sun and well-drained soil; the plant is drought tolerant.

Zones: 6-9

Native to North America: No

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Weeping Birch

Grow weeping birch for an amazing presence in your landscape all year long. The tumbling branches and white peeling bark look beautiful in every season. In spring and summer, it offers arrow-shaped green leaves; they turn a brilliant shade of gold in autumn.

Name: Betula pendula ‘Youngii’

Size: To 25 feet tall and wide

Growing Condition: Full sun or part shade and moist, well-drained soil; it does best in cool summer climates.

Zones: 2-7

Native to North America: No

Weeping Japanese Larch

Weeping Japanese larch is fun for the landscape. Like the other weeping trees, it offers cascading branches. But, in spring and summer, it shows off emerald-green needles that turn a rich shade of gold every autumn before falling to the ground.

Name: Larix kaempferi ‘Diana’

Size: To 20 feet tall and wide

Growing Conditions: Full sun or part shade and moist, well-drained soil

Zones: 5-7

Native to North America: No

Weeping Redwood

The weeping form of one of the world’s tallest trees, weeping redwood grows up but has cascading side branches. The trunk doesn’t always grow straight, allowing it to form a unique, imposing figure in the landscape.

Name: Sequoiadendron giganteum ‘Pendulum’

Size: To 50 feet tall and 20 feet wide

Growing Conditions: Full sun or part shade and moist, well-drained soil

Zones: 6-9

Native to North America: Yes

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Weeping Crabapple

Many common trees have weeping varieties, including gorgeous spring-blooming crabapples. There are several selections, including ‘Louisa’, shown here, which features soft pink flowers, golden-yellow fall colors, and showy yellowish fruits.

Name: Malus ‘Louisa’

Size: To 15 feet tall and wide

Growing Conditions: Full sun and moist, well-drained soil

Zones: 4-8

Native to North America: No

Weeping Norway Spruce

Another fine evergreen tree, weeping Norway spruce, offers rich, dark green needles and lovely drooping branches. It’s one of the best evergreens to grow in cold climates and is reputedly one of the most deer resistant.

Name: Picea abies ‘Pendula’

Size: To 15 feet tall and wide

Growing Conditions: Full sun and moist, well-drained soil

Zones: 3-7

Native to North America: No

10

Weeping White Pine

A graceful weeping evergreen tree that offers long, soft needles, weeping white pine is perfect for making a focal point in the garden. It has an irregular growth pattern, so no two trees are alike (but all are gorgeous).

Name: Pinus strobus ‘Pendula’

Size: To 20 feet tall and wide

Growing Conditions: Full sun or part shade and moist, well-drained soil

Zones: 3-8

Native to North America: Yes

11

Weeping Willow

Think about a weeping tree and weeping willow probably comes to mind. This easy-to-grow tree has a graceful shape and attractive golden-yellow fall color. It’s one of the faster-growing trees, but that means it’s also weak and easily damaged by storms.

Name: Salix alba ‘Tristis’

Size: To 75 feet tall and wide

Growing conditions: Full sun and moist to wet soil

Zones: 4-8

Native to North America: No

Willows can be invasive in some areas; check local restrictions before planting them.

12

Weeping Cherry

A delightful addition to the spring landscape, weeping cherry shows off clusters of white flowers that hang from gracefully cascading branches. The shiny, coppery bark and attractive fall foliage in shades of orange and yellow is beautiful.

Name: Snow Fountains weeping cherry (Prunus ‘Snofozam’)

Size: To 15 feet tall and 8 feet wide

Growing Conditions: Full sun and moist, well-drained soil

Zones: 5-8

Native to North America: No

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13

Japanese Maple

When planted in moist, well-drained soil this Japanese maple unfurls brilliant red foliage.

Several varieties of Japanese maple offer branches that droop toward the ground so that you can find the form in plants with burgundy, green, or even gold leaves. Smaller varieties fit well in the border and also work well in containers. ‘Red Dragon’ is the variety shown here.

Name: Acer palmatum ‘Red Dragon’

Size: To 10 feet tall and 12 feet wide; it’s a slow grower.

Growing conditions: Full sun or part shade and moist, well-drained soil

Zones: 6-8

Native to North America: No

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Sources

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  1. Weeping willow Salix babylonica L. Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States

Most Popular Flowers & Plants in the USA

RegionPopular FlowersPopular Plants
Northeast (e.g., New York, Massachusetts)Rose, Purple Lilac, Mountain LaurelSugar Maple, American Elm, White Pine
Southeast (e.g., Florida, Georgia)Orange Blossom, Cherokee Rose, Southern MagnoliaLive Oak, Spanish Moss, Saw Palmetto
Midwest (e.g., Ohio, Illinois)Carnation, Violet, Purple ConeflowerBur Oak, Prairie Grasses, Wild Bergamot
Southwest (e.g., Texas, Arizona)Bluebonnet, Saguaro Cactus Flower, Indian PaintbrushJoshua Tree, Agave, Mesquite
West (e.g., California, Washington)California Poppy, Coast Rhododendron, BitterrootGiant Sequoia, Redwood, Manzanita
Rocky Mountain (e.g., Colorado, Montana)Rocky Mountain Columbine, Bitterroot, Indian PaintbrushBlue Spruce, Aspen, Sagebrush
Great Plains (e.g., Kansas, Nebraska)Sunflower, Goldenrod, Purple ConeflowerCottonwood, Bluestem Grasses, Buffalo Grass
Pacific Northwest (e.g., Oregon, Alaska)Oregon Grape, Forget-me-not, Pacific RhododendronDouglas Fir, Western Hemlock, Ferns

This table includes the most popular flowers and plants in the USA by region, which considers a range of botanical species, including native and widely cultivated varieties.

Most Popular Flowers & Plants in Australia

RegionPopular FlowersPopular Plants
New South WalesWaratah, Bottlebrush, Flannel FlowerEucalyptus, Acacia, Banksia
VictoriaCommon Heath, Waxflower, Pink HeathMountain Ash, Silver Wattle, Victorian Blue Gum
QueenslandCooktown Orchid, Golden Penda, Umbrella Tree FlowerMoreton Bay Fig, Macadamia Nut, Queensland Bottle Tree
South AustraliaSturt's Desert Pea, Kangaroo Paw, Eucalyptus BlossomAdelaide Blue Gum, South Australian Blue Gum, Saltbush
Western AustraliaRed and Green Kangaroo Paw, Mangles Kangaroo Paw, Swan River DaisyJarrah, Marri, Karri
TasmaniaTasmanian Blue Gum, Leatherwood Flower, Tasmanian WaratahHuon Pine, Tasmanian Oak, Myrtle Beech
Northern TerritorySturt's Desert Rose, Frangipani, Desert RoseBoab, Gidgee, Spinifex
Australian Capital TerritoryRoyal Bluebell, Australian Daisy, CorreaSnow Gum, River Red Gum, Black Mountain

This table offers a basic overview of popular flowers and plants in each Australian region, focusing on a combination of state flowers, native species, and other characteristic plants. It's important to note that specific species' popularity and prevalence can vary. This table is a simplified representation. Consulting local botanical gardens or regional horticultural societies in Australia would be ideal for more detailed and accurate information.

Charlotte Gammon

By Charlotte Gammon

Meet Charlotte Gammon, our expert and author. She's our true treasure, as she has got 20+ years of experience in gardening, winery and house design. In early 2000s, she worked for today.com magazine and was in charge of the gaardening section. Later on, Charlotte opened her own designer agency and worked as a designer and decorator. We are happy to have Charlotte with us, as she is our good friend. We value her experience and we're sure you will love the articles she created for our blog.